Thanking God for Everything

Today I’m sharing from Lifeway Voices.

Thanking God for Everything

by 

Nestled among a long list of exhortations and blessings in 1 Thessalonians is a line we’ll see in plenty this month. Distressed on barn wood at your local craft store, printed on banners hung in the dining room, embossed on the ceramic plate the turkey is served on, and rife in sermons everywhere, “Give thanks in everything,” is the rally cry of November. But, like Aunt Jane’s consistently overcooked turkey, the truncated statement can also leave a dry taste in our mouths.

Gratitude will be on the rise for the next two months, followed by a sharp decline on January first when we resolve to change all the things our mere gratitude couldn’t change: love-handles, schedules, relationships, the project we’ve been putting off. There’s nothing like a full serving of gratitude to show us just how many things exist for which we’re still not thankful. We will give thanks for everything except all the things for which we’re still bent on changing.

I have a stack on my desk of books to read and review, menu-plans to make, a driver’s license to renew, and a book contract to fulfill within the first month of 2019. As grateful as I am for a job I love, the freedom to eat and cook whole, healthy food, and a license to drive, I’m decidedly unthankful for the work they all will require of me. I can trick myself into being grateful, topping my cake of grumbling with the frosting of thanksgiving, but it’s still a dismal cake beneath. I need the words with which Paul follows up his exhortation: “For this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.”

For what is God’s will for me? This.

Read the rest here.

The God Without … A Thanksgiving Message

I have shared this message from Grace Thru Faith before, but it is so good that I decided to make it my annual Thanksgiving message. May you all enjoy a wonderful Thanksgiving Day!

The God Without …
A Thanksgiving Message

A Thanksgiving Message by Jack Kelley

Shout for joy to the LORD, all the earth. Worship the LORD with gladness; come before him with joyful songs. Know that the LORD is God. It is he who made us, and we are his; we are his people, the sheep of his pasture.

Enter his gates with thanksgiving and his courts with praise; give thanks to him and praise his name.   For the LORD is good and his love endures forever; his faithfulness continues through all generations. (Psalm 100)

Each year on the 4th Thursday of November we celebrate Thanksgiving Day in the US.  It’s a holiday begun by the early settlers to express their gratitude to God for a bountiful harvest, and it’s patterned after the Jewish Feast of Tabernacles.

After the harvest Israelites from all over the country would gather in Jerusalem for a week-long celebration. This was to commemorate the time God had spent with them in the wilderness and to give thanks for another good harvest. All year they saved up their tithes, the first-born of their flocks and herds, the first sheaves of grain, the first grapes, figs, olives and other fruit and vegetables and brought it all to Jerusalem in the fall where they cooked and ate everything in a national celebration of praise (Deut. 12:5-7).

After surviving a very difficult year in the new world, the Pilgrims of New England instituted a similar, though much smaller, thanksgiving feast, again with the intent of praising God.   This event finally became a national holiday in the US in 1863, but it took until 1941 to settle on the 4th Thursday of November as its official observance.

My parents made sure we never forgot that it was the Lord who provided for us and so Thanksgiving was a religious observance in our house. Prayers were offered and each family member gave thanks to the Lord for all the good things we had received.

Read the rest here.

Thanksgiving for the Thankworthy

Thanksgiving for the Thankworthy

By Pat Knight

In 1621, the first Thanksgiving in America joined culturally diverse Native Americans and newly arrived colonists for a feast of fresh produce, wild game, and simple baked goods to celebrate their first harvest in the New World. Since the 1800s, annual Thanksgiving feasts have been celebrated in the US. Congress passed a joint resolution establishing a permanent, annual, day of Thanksgiving, designated as the fourth Thursday in November, to commence in 1942. The legal holiday was founded as a religious observance for all citizens to express thanksgiving to God for His blessings during the previous year.

In centuries past, the Israelites observed mandatory thank offerings and specific feasts several times each year, commemorating the Lord’s gifts and blessings, a periodic reminder for worshippers to lavish their heavenly Father with thanksgiving for abundant harvests and consistent blessings.

Some people claim that a thank-you simply demonstrates good manners. For Christians, giving thanks exceeds etiquette and a yearly feast. Believers embrace a perpetually grateful attitude of the heart, a pattern as natural as breathing.

Thanksgiving emerges from a heart in tune with the heavenly Father.

Water surging headlong over a steep precipice reveals a picturesque waterfall as prisms of water droplets in sunlight produce scintillating rainbows; similar beauty cascades from a heart of thanksgiving.

In response to God’s miraculous rescue of His people following four centuries of slave labor in Egypt, Moses and the Israelites burst into songs of praise. During their escape, millions of Israelites traveling on foot stopped abruptly when confronted with the hopeless task of crossing the Red Sea.

“Nothing is impossible with God” (Luke 1:37), who rolled the water upward, exposing a path of dry land for the people to walk through. As soon as the last remnant of God’s people safely reached the opposite shore, the pursuing Egyptian army was swallowed by the returning walls of the sea. The Israeli song praised God’s power, majesty, and mercy during His spectacular deliverance (Exodus 15:1-21).

Hannah and Elkanah were married but childless in a culture where barren women were often harassed until their spirits were crushed with shame and reproach. At the tabernacle, Hannah poured out her heartbreak to God in a passionate prayer, pleading for a son. Sometime later Hannah gave birth to a boy. As she had promised God in her prayer, Hannah delivered Samuel to the priest for a lifetime of dedicated service at the temple (1 Samuel 2:1-10).

Hannah’s song of gratitude proclaims that life and death, prosperity and poverty, humility and exultation, are all determined by the power of a personal God. Hannah professed that God functions in supreme ways we neither predict nor fully understand, but He always answers believer’s prayers in unexpected, extraordinary ways. Hannah’s song is prophetic, the first announcement of the Lord’s anointed in the Bible. Centuries later, her inspired words found fulfillment in the birth of Christ, the Messiah.

The Magnificat (Luke 1:46-55), is one of the most familiar songs of thanksgiving in Scripture, which Mary composed following the angel’s announcement that she had been chosen as mother of the promised Messiah. Mary glorified God, affirming His mercy, might, and magnificence; His unfailing love and goodness. As words of praise spilled from her grateful heart, Mary acknowledged that God had chosen His humble servant for an exalted assignment.

Adoration praises God for who He is. “Call to God who is worthy of praise” (Psalm 18:3). Thanksgiving expresses gratitude for what God has done. Believers pray with confidence, assured our Lord will answer every petition. Since we attest to God’s faithfulness, anticipating responses to our prayers yields a spirit of thanksgiving, assured God’s replies will always reflect His perfect will for each of us. Trust then becomes a form of worship as we thank God in advance for his blessings. “Don’t worry about anything; instead, pray about everything. Tell God what you need, and thank him for all he has done. Then you will experience God’s peace, which exceeds anything we can understand. His peace will guard your hearts and minds as you live in Christ Jesus (Philippians 4:6-7, NLT). Prayers of His people invite God’s extravagant blessings.

God’s plan of salvation and Jesus’ willingness to sacrifice His holy life for the redemption of our sins evoke prayers of thanksgiving. Praise is our method of offering heartfelt joy to the Father and Son. “But thanks be to God! He gives us the victory through Jesus Christ the Lord” (1 Corinthians 15:57). It is important to recognize the myriad blessings our Lord bestows on us every day: maintaining wellness of body and mind, and provision of needs—restful sleep, reliable transportation, secure homes, family near and far, clean, plentiful drinking water. Gratitude naturally pours from a believer’s humble, joy-filled heart.

“Give thanks in all circumstances, for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus” (1 Thessalonians 5:18).The word, “all” is tiny but inclusive, enveloping the whole of one’s possessions, resources, energy, and relationships. God desires our gratitude at all times, through the good and the bad; in delightful and challenging situations, for the purpose of maturing our faith and offering God glory and honor. “Through Jesus, therefore, let us continually offer to God a sacrifice of praise—the fruit of lips that confess his name” (Hebrews 13:15).

Thanksgiving is the springboard to spiritual joy. 

Worship consists of praise, adoration, song, and prayer, aspects of thanksgiving that convey love and reverence to the sovereign Father and Son. The contemporary use of worship is derived from the old English word, “worthship,” denoting the worthiness of God. Thankworthy reflects gratitude through worship. No one exemplifies worship of the heavenly Father more perfectly than Jesus, who offered the ultimate sacrifice of praise, the motivation for a life overflowing with thanksgiving. Jesus is the standard of worship to the Father, a heavenly portrait of goodness and grace.

The very essence of thanksgiving compels jubilation.

 “Thank you! Everything in me says ‘Thank you!’  Angels listen as I sing my thanks…Thank you for your love, thank you for your faithfulness; Most holy is your name, most holy is your Word. The moment I called out, you stepped in; you made my life large with strength. When they hear what you have to say, God, all earth’s kings will say, ‘Thank you!’ They’ll sing of what you’ve done: ‘How great the glory of God!’ And here’s why: God, high above, sees far below; no matter the distance, he knows everything about us’” (Psalm 138:1-6,The Msg.).

Our Lord is the source of thankworthiness!

I Trust in You, O LORD

But I trust in You, O LORD;
I say, “You are my God.” 

My times are in Your hands.
—Psalm 31:14-15

Once again, I struggled to unscrew the top from a jar but the stubborn cap refused to budge. Just as I was getting ready to call on Rick for help, it came loose.

I hated having to ask Rick for help so often, but the arthritis in my fingers and carpal tunnel problems with my wrists cause difficulties with the simplest tasks. Daily my frustration grows as I witness different parts of my body getting weaker and sometimes even breaking down. These days I can’t even get down onto the floor or up again without great pain and difficulty because of my bad knees.

Why do things have to be this way? I silently ask God, but I already know the answer: “Trust Me, child, I’m always here to take care of you.”

What would we do without the promises of such a loving God who faithfully guides us through the trials of life? He knows everything about us, which means He understands our limitations. He has intimate knowledge about how much we hurt and He is always with us to comfort our painful and grieving body and spirit. He holds us close to His heart in His ever-powerful hands.

I know my God takes care of me—I believe this without a shadow of doubt. I guess my real problems start when I focus on my problems instead of on God. He realizes my pain and frustration and provides the best comfort possible through His Word. How often I have been in despair and found in Scripture the very words I needed to calm my heart.

Imagine the strength in God’s hands. Now picture those same hands pulling you close in a calm and comforting embrace. His strength is our strength and can get us through those frustrating times when nothing seems to go right.

Beloved, our times are in God’s hands because everything in our lives is under His control.

Kindness in Action

Here is a simple rule-of-thumb guide for behavior.
Ask yourself what you want people to do for you,
then grab the initiative and do it for them.
—Matthew 7:12, The Msg.

Kindness in Action

By Pat Knight

In the orthopedic surgeon’s waiting room, several of us were anticipating an X-ray prior to our first post-surgical visit. Seated near me was a man holding a fistful of medicine bottles, nervously rolling them in the palms of his hands. He was muttering angrily in broken English to his companion that he couldn’t understand the necessity of having another X-ray, and he was “planning to tell them so.” Just then, a young, vivacious X-ray technician addressed the distraught man by name and announced, “I’m going to take a quick X-ray before you see the doctor.” With great effort, he stood up, flashing a side-long glance at the technician, as if reconsidering his defiant approach.

The technician offered her outstretched arm for him to grasp, asking, “Can I help you?” Even before he replied, she steadied him as they began walking, cheerfully chatting about the beautiful weather that day. It was apparent the man had reformulated his plan of opposition in response to cheerful kindness. If I were to venture a guess about the outcome, I think they had a pleasant visit, with the man’s anger dissolving as quickly as the melting winter snow on his boots.

In God’s Word, the Golden Rule is the most universally known command guiding our behavior, though not commonly practiced. The rule instructs us to treat others as we want to be treated. One Bible translation takes our responsibility a step further. “Here is a simple rule-of-thumb guide for behavior. Ask yourself what you want people to do for you, then grab the initiative and do it for them” (Matthew 7:12, The Msg.). Since everyone craves kind treatment, it is each believer’s function to disseminate kindness to others. The vehicle of kindness operates with the fuel of cheer, propelled by good works. Imagine what a pleasant world it would be if each individual made kindness a priority.

Some acts of kindness are premeditated when we are alerted beforehand to a need. Joshua secretly sent two spies to the walled city of Jericho to assess how best to attack and capture the inhabitants and the land. The king was apprised of the presence of spies in his city, so he confronted Rahab, a prostitute and innkeeper, as to her knowledge of the stranger’s whereabouts. She admitted the spies had been in her establishment but that they had left before the gates of the city were closed at dusk. Rahab deceptively directed the soldiers to follow the spies toward the Jordan River. In reality, she had hidden the two spies underneath flax drying on her rooftop.

Rahab informed the spies that her people were well aware of the continual miracles their God had performed to rescue and protect the Israelites. She specifically mentioned their knowledge of the parting of the Red Sea, causing the citizens of Jericho to melt in fear because of the Israelite’s God. Rahab professed her personal faith: “‘The Lord your God is God in heaven above and on earth below’” (Joshua 2:11). Then Rahab offered to help the spies if they saved her family before the city was destroyed. “‘Please swear to me by the Lord, that you will show kindness to my family, because I have shown kindness to you’” (v.12). The spies agreed. “‘Our lives for your lives! If you don’t tell what we are doing, we will treat you kindly and faithfully when the Lord gives us the land’” (v.14). From her window in the city wall, Rahab let the spies down to the ground and instructed them to hide in the hills until the militia abandoned their search in three days.

The mutual kindness between strangers was predicated on trust. For their agreement to succeed, it was necessary for both partners to remain faithful. The spies must remember their promise to Rahab. She agreed to drop a scarlet cord from her outside window to identify the location of her family. Ultimately, all the believers were following the will of God, who orchestrated the perfect plan. “‘I am the Lord who exercises kindness, justice and righteousness on earth, for in these I delight’, declares the Lord” (Jeremiah 9:24b). Rahab and her family were saved, she was honored by Joshua, and her name is forever engraved in the lineage of Jesus, the Messiah (Matthew 1:5).

In addition to deliberately planned acts of kindness, we frequently perform random, spontaneous benevolent deeds. We spring into action when a situation presents itself. The moment may not be the most opportune for us, but in that instant we decide that another’s delight or safety is more important than our own convenience.

You cannot do a kindness too soon, for you never know how soon it will be too late. ─Ralph Waldo Emerson

In Jesus’ parable of the Good Samaritan, a man was walking alone on a road with a notorious reputation for sheltering opportunistic robbers who ambushed defenseless travelers. The pedestrian was attacked physically, stripped of his clothes and valuables, and left for dead. Both a priest and a Levite passed the beaten, bleeding man, ignoring him by crossing to the opposite side of the road. A Samaritan, hated by Jews and labeled a half-breed, came to the aid of the dying man. He anointed the man with oil and wine and bandaged his wounds. Then he lifted the stranger onto his own donkey, delivered him to an inn, and personally cared for him. The following day the Samaritan gave the innkeeper enough money to house and care for the stranger until he returned, at which time he promised to reimburse any additional funds he owed. (Luke 10:30-37). The parable illustrates the total devotion demanded by the Great Commandment. “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and love your neighbor as yourself” (Luke 10:27).

Kindness is defined as extending tenderness or goodwill; lavishing with happiness and grace. In God’s Word, it is frequently synonymous with love, lovingkindness, or unfailing love, often summarizing God’s covenants with His people. The Lord said, “‘I have loved you with an everlasting love; I have drawn you {to myself} with unfailing kindness’” (Jeremiah31:3).

On earth, Christ showed kindness to everyone He encountered, regardless of their status. It is imperative that we learn the life principle Jesus embraced. When the Messiah was crucified, His body had already been physically abused beyond recognition. Tortured and with His last remaining trace of energy, Christ offered compassion to the criminal crucified on the cross beside Him.

“‘Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise’” (Luke 23:43). Christ granted kindness during His worst hour. Surely we can express similar outreach to others during our best of times. God expects more than civility in our relationships; He empowers us to adopt Jesus’ attributes. “As God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourself with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience” (Colossians 3:12). Our compassion and kindness that imitate Jesus indicate a deep stirring within our inner spirit. True character is revealed when the charity that wells up in our hearts converts to tangible acts of lovingkindness.


All Bible references are taken from the NIV unless otherwise indicated.