Taking a Rest Break

O our God, will You not judge them?
For we have no power against this great multitude
that is coming against us;
nor do we know what to do, but our eyes are upon You.
—2 Chronicles 20:12

Taking a Rest Break

I am very thankful that I have been able to keep up with my blog over the past few months in spite of chronic illnesses that seem to take over my life. The writing contributions by Pat Knight and Tammi Rhoney (our newest contributor) are a huge help and I want to take the opportunity to thank them here from the bottom of my heart. The fact that they also live with chronic pain illnesses and are willing to add their writing to my blog is a huge blessing to me!

Recently I woke up with the words “I don’t know what to do but my eyes are on You” running through my mind. I believe this was God’s way of encouraging me to keep trusting Him in this difficult season of my life, no matter what. 

What others mean to you as evil God promises to use for good. He wastes nothing. —Chuck Swindoll

God wastes nothing. That thought is definitely worth repeating, pondering and praying about. It means that although God allows troubling situations in our lives, He provides us with the strength to live joyfully with those troubles, but more importantly, He helps us comfort others who are going through similar circumstances. 

Beloved, I’ll be back in a couple of weeks and will be praying for all of us who are going through trying times.

Heavenly Father, You are so wise and loving and good to us, and we are ever thankful for Your presence in our lives. Fill us with Your wisdom so that we will know how and when to share Your joyful message of hope and comfort with others who are going through similar things. You are great and greatly to be praised! We honor and glorify You for all that You do in our lives to shape us into the people You want us to be… in You. Thank You for another day in which to praise and honor You! In Jesus’ precious Name I pray this. Amen.

 

Prayer for the #Coronavirus Situation

As we are aware, the Coronavirus is affecting people all over the world and many are panicking. Yes, we are to be concerned with this situation, but rather than letting fear rule our lives right now, take the time to read the excellent, common-sense advice from Dr. James Robb (a Virologist and Pathologist) about taking care of yourself during the COVID-19 pandemic.

There is also a need for mighty prayer for and about this situation. The prayer below was in my latest Pocket Testament League newsletter.

Prayer for COVID-19

David Collum
CEO, The Pocket Testament League
www.ptl.org

I invite you to pray for our country, the world, in fact every individual, to be delivered from COVID-19.

President Donald Trump has asked, that “no matter where you be, I encourage you to turn toward prayer…”

If I could be with you, in a global room, praying, I would no doubt hear our multitude of prayers rising to God’s throne-room. I invite you to pray for our country, the world, in fact every individual, to be delivered from COVID-19. I invite you to pray for our leaders in authority over us: our president, our governors, our legislatures and our courts, both federal and state.

Because we cannot be together, I offer the prayer below:

Almighty God, I praise you as the creator of our universe, our planet, and this good land that you have graciously given us as our heritage.

I pray that I may always prove myself mindful of your love and goodness, and that I will be glad to do your will.

Lord, I pray today for this world, for our nation, for every single person who has been created in your image, to be delivered from this global disease.

Father, your Word in Isaiah 59:1, tells us, “Behold, the Lord’s hand is not shortened, that it cannot save, or his ear dull, that it cannot hear;”

Father, your Word goes onto say in verse 2, “but your iniquities have made a separation between you and your God, and your sins have hidden his face from you so that he does not hear.”

Father, by your Holy Spirit convict my mind and heart of my sin, that I may repent and run to you for forgiveness offered by and through the precious blood of your Son.

Father, by your Holy Spirit, turn the hearts of all people to you. Save us from violence, discord, and confusion; from pride and arrogance, and from every evil way.

Father, bless our leaders: our president, our governors, our federal and state legislatures and courts. Fill them with strength and wisdom. Spur them on to truth and righteousness.

Father, finally, I pray that our faith in you never fail, that we number our days, that we live as people of hope, whose home is with you, and that we keep our eyes fixed on your Son, the author and perfecter of our faith, in whose mighty Name we pray, Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.


Read the common-sense advice from Dr. James Robb here.

Understanding the Holy Spirit and His Role in the Trinity

Today I’m sharing from The NIV Bible blog.

Understanding the Holy Spirit
and His Role in the Trinity

This is how we know that we belong to the truth and how we set our hearts at rest in his presence: If our hearts condemn us, we know that God is greater than our hearts, and he knows everything. Dear friends, if our hearts do not condemn us, we have confidence before God and receive from him anything we ask, because we keep his commands and do what pleases him. And this is his command: to believe in the name of his Son, Jesus Christ, and to love one another as he commanded us. The one who keeps God’s commands lives in him, and he in them. And this is how we know that he lives in us: We know it by the Spirit he gave us. — 1 John 3:19-24

What Is the Holy Spirit?

It is interesting that throughout Scripture the Holy Spirit is not given a personal name such as Yahweh or Emmanuel, but is described only in terms of His work. Perhaps that omission has led some to think of the Holy Spirit as a force, a power, or an influence—some entity less than a person.

The Holy Spirit does not have a physical body, but rather describes qualities, characteristics, and actions. Here’s what the Bible says about the Holy Spirit —

• He thinks and feels (1 Corinthians 2:10-11)
• He decides (1 Corinthians 12:11)
• He speaks (John 15:26)
• He teaches (John 14:26)
• He intercedes for us (Romans 8:26)
• He helps to make our weaknesses become empowered strengths (2 Corinthians 12:9)
• He guides (1 Corinthians 2:13)
• He can be lied to (Acts 5:3), insulted (Hebrews 10:29), grieved (Ephesians 4:30), and resisted (Acts 7:51).

In the New Testament, the Holy Spirit comes to us in person to glorify Christ in every believer as He works to create God’s family on the earth—that is, the Church as God’s household. He is called the Spirit of truth (John 16:13) and our Advocate (John 14:26). When He indwells the life of the believer, He takes the truth of the words of Christ, and reveals their depth of meaning to that individual.

Jesus taught that attributing the work of the Holy Spirit to the devil was the worst sin a person could commit (Matthew 12:32). Indeed, what hope was there for one who rejected “the Spirit [who] gives life”? (John 6:63). Jesus Himself was “full of joy through the Holy Spirit” when He reflected upon God the Father’s purposes and activities (Luke 10:21). Furthermore, He gave His disciples reason to rejoice by telling them the Holy Spirit would be their divine helper in the years to come (see John 14:26). His words revealed the Holy Spirit’s role within the Trinity: In this instance, Jesus said that the Spirit would proceed from the Father, be sent by the Son, and bear witness about the Son (John 15:26–27).

What Does the Holy Spirit Do?

The work of the Holy Spirit is to glorify Christ and make Him real in the daily life of every believer. The Holy Spirit serves as God’s divine Administrator on earth and He desires and works to recreate the life of Christ in His people.

Read the rest here.

Welcome Tammi Rhoney!

I am happy to announce the addition of a new writer to my team. Tammi Rhoney and I met online years ago when we both wrote for the same chronic illness site, as did Pat Knight.

Like me, Tammi lives with ME/CFS (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), and because she is also homebound much of the time, she appreciates being able to minister to people through her photography. She also writes for a couple of other sites.

Tammi loves Jesus, butterflies, bird watching, photography, sewing and stenciling. Her favorite seasons are spring and fall. She is an avid bird watcher and enjoys taking photos of wildlife and flowers. Tammi and her husband Todd live in North Carolina with Mini, their miniature dachshund.

Be looking for Tammi’s first post in the next couple of weeks!

Welcome to my blog, Tammi! I look forward to sharing your writing with my readers!


Photo credit: Kaitlyn Baker on Unsplash

Rejoice Always

Today I’m sharing from the Ligonier blog.

Rejoice Always

From

Do you know what the shortest verse in the New Testament is? The obvious answer is John 11:35: “Jesus wept.” It is the shortest verse in our English translations of the Bible. But the shortest verse in the Greek New Testament is 1 Thessalonians 5:16: “Rejoice always.” It is a little verse with big implications.

The word “rejoice” is a call to joy. The term was a watchword among early Christians. More than a term of worship, it was a word of salutation. Jesus used it as a greeting (Matt. 28:9). Paul used it as a farewell (2 Cor. 13:11). We typically greet one another with “Hello” or “Goodbye.” But what an encouragement it would be if we entered and departed one another’s presence with a call to rejoice.

In 1 Thessalonians 5:16, Paul exhorts the saints to rejoice. It is a command, which makes it clear that joy is more than happiness. Happiness is an emotional response to favorable, pleasant, or rewarding circumstances. You cannot compel a person to be happy. It’s based on what happens to a person. But Christians are commanded by God to rejoice. This command to rejoice is in the present tense. It means “keep on rejoicing.” This makes 1 Thessalonians 5:16 a hard command. This divine mandate would be easier to swallow if it simply directed us to rejoice. Indeed, there are many times, reasons, and occasions that call for rejoicing. But the command is to rejoice always, not only sometimes. How does the Christian rejoice always?

First Thessalonians 5:16–18 features what have been called “the standing orders of the gospel.” These exhortations apply to all Christians in every place and every situation. “Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances.” These commands may be familiar. But the justification for the commands is often overlooked: “for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.” Do we want to know God’s will for us in any situation? It is God’s will that we rejoice always, pray without ceasing, and give thanks in all circumstances. We are in spiritual rebellion if we are not joyful, prayerful, and thankful. God’s will for our lives is about more than the circumstances we face. It is about how we respond to those circumstances.

It is the will of God for us to rejoice always. But obedience to this command is not accomplished by an act of the will. It is only accomplished by faith in Christ. The believer’s unceasing rejoicing is the will of God for us “in Christ Jesus.” This is the key to the life of rejoicing. Unsaved people do not rejoice in God, pray to God, or give thanks to God. Religious people rejoice sometimes, pray when they feel like it, and give thanks when things are going well. But Christians rejoice always, pray without ceasing, and give thanks in all circumstances. This is not the believer’s response because we are impervious to life’s dangers, toils, and snares. It is our response to life because we are in Christ Jesus.

Read the rest here.

9 Ways to Guard Your Personal Relationship with God

Today I’m sharing from Crossway.org.

9 Ways to Guard
Your Personal Relationship
with God

by: David Murray

Time and Energy Required

Like all healthy and satisfying relationships, our relationship with God needs time and energy. But giving time and energy to our relationship with God actually increases free time and energy because it helps us get a better perspective on life and order our priorities better, it reduces the time we spend on image management, and it removes fear and anxiety.

Here are some things that have helped me to keep my personal relationship with God personal and avoid falling into the trap of relating to him only through my ministry to others:

1. Guarded Time

I try to guard personal Bible reading and prayer time as jealously as I guard my own children. I keep my 6:20 a.m. appointment with God each morning as zealously as if it were an appointment for kidney dialysis.

2. Undistracted Mind

In a survey of eight thousand of its readers, desiringGod.org found that 54 percent checked their smartphones within minutes of waking up. More than 70 percent admitted that they checked email and social media before their spiritual disciplines.1 I agree with Tony Reinke, who commented, “Whatever we focus our hearts on first in the morning will shape our entire day.” So I have resolved not to check email, social media, or the news before my devotional time, as I want to bring a mind that is as clear and focused as possible to God’s Word.

3. Vocal Prayers

As I always pray better when I pray out loud, I like to find a place where I can do so without embarrassment. Hearing my own prayers helps me improve the clarity and intensity of my prayer. Also, I cannot cover up a wandering heart or mind so easily when I pray out loud.

4. Varied Devotions

Sometimes I read a psalm, a chapter from the Old Testament, and a chapter from the New. Other times I read just one chapter or part of a chapter and spend longer meditating on it. Or I may read through a Bible book with a good commentary. Though the speed varies, I do try to make sure that I’m reading systematically through both testaments and not just jumping around here and there.

Read the rest here.

He fires the starting pistol, then runs alongside you

Today I’m sharing from Love Worth Finding.

He fires the starting pistol,
then runs alongside you

BIBLE MEDITATION:

Looking unto Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith…. Hebrews 12:2a

DEVOTIONAL THOUGHT:

Faith comes from beholding the Lord Jesus Christ, from looking at Him. If we will look to Jesus, He will be the author and finisher of our faith. The word “author” in the Greek literally means “example,” “leader,” or “originator.” Jesus is the example of faith, but He’s also the originator of our faith.

You see, all the other heroes of the faith mentioned in Hebrews 11 can cheer us on, but they’re not our chief example. Only Jesus is the One who never sinned, who never failed. The more you behold the Lord Jesus Christ, the more you’ll find out He is the author and finisher.

He’s the one who originates the grace. He’s the one who fires the starting gun. He’s the goal toward which we run. He is the coach who runs alongside us and gives us courage and strength to run the race.

ACTION POINT:

It is Jesus all the way. If you want faith, fix your eyes upon Jesus Christ. Keep “looking unto Jesus.” Your faith will grow. You’ll be greatly strengthened for your race.


You can also read this devotional here.