The Secret of Contentment

The Secret of Contentment

by Joni Eareckson Tada

“I know what it is to be in need, and I know what it is to have plenty. I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want. I can do everything through him who gives me strength.” —Philippians 4:12-13

I saw a man in the supermarket yesterday using a new sporty wheelchair. When he zipped down the aisle, his chair didn’t make a squeak. I looked down at my big clunky twenty-year-old model with dirt on the frame and threadbare padding. Little wonder I looked with envy at his high-tech wheels.

I’d like a trade-in on my wheelchair. Perhaps you would like a trade-in on your old car. Perhaps the grass seems greener down the street where they are building brand new homes. Yes, an automatic garage door opener and a trash compactor would be great to have. But sometimes when we compile our desires up against God’s desires for us, I wonder how many match.

The apostle Paul says that he has learned the secret of remaining content despite either plenty or poverty. What was the secret Paul had learned? He gave it away in his next breath when he said that he was ready for anything through the strength of the One who lived inside him.

Contentment is found not in circumstances.
Contentment is found in a Person, the Lord Jesus.

It requires a special act of grace to accommodate ourselves to every condition of life, to carry an equal temper of mind through every circumstance. On the one hand, only in Christ can we face poverty contentedly, that is, without losing our comfort in God. On the other hand, only in Christ can we face plenty and not be filled with pride.

Lord, there are many things I desire, but I really don’t need. Subtract my desires and keep me from adding my own wants. Help me to find satisfaction in You, for only then will I find real and lasting contentment.


Taken from Diamonds in the Dust by Joni Eareckson Tada. 

Copyright © 1993. Published in Print by Zondervan, Grand Rapids. 

All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible: New International Version.

Godliness + Contentment

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Godliness + Contentment

By Patricia Knight

“But godliness with contentment is great gain” (1 Timothy 6:6).

We could list the aspects of our lives that have changed due to the invasion of adversity, but that exercise would not change our circumstances. Instead of stressing the negative, why not accentuate the positive? List the gains rather than the losses. Reflect on the people you’ve met, the introspection you’ve gained, the spiritual strength and dependency that has grown, the patience learned, and the ability to mature in your faith.

If we are able to combine our faith with personal well-being, then improvement or enrichment will result. We have learned the secret for peace of mind. Following God, no matter what occurs in our lives, believing that whatever He chooses is best for us, and telling others about God’s goodness and grace, will all contribute toward our personal and spiritual riches.

1Thes5-18-HandSilhouetteSunset-35--AMPAs difficult as it may seem, we can develop a greater dependency upon our Lord even during afflictions. Therefore, we can go forward to accomplish whatever God asks us to do for Him, not in spite of pain, but because of it. We are commanded to “give thanks in all circumstances”(1 Thessalonians 5:18). The thankfulness we express is not an appreciation for leading a restricted, hurtful life, but rather it is a means of recognizing and showing gratitude for God’s sovereign leadership in our lives. Whatever He plans for us is perfect in its design and timing. 

Learning patience and perseverance produces a stronger faith. We learn those attributes by practicing them. Our hardship gives us reason to develop positive and useful emotional tools—those with which we can reach out to others in their time of need.  Christian maturity will follow.

When God has something to teach us, He may set us aside in order to instruct us in life’s lessons. The experience we gain will be invaluable in serving a loving, faithful God and others.

“Godliness + contentment = great gain”
is a method of expressing the verse as a formula for life.
It defines a spiritual goal for us—
one that God honors.

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Reasons to Be Content

Here’s another great devotional about contentment,
this one from John MacArthur’s daily devotional email series
.

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Reasons to Be Content

“‘For this reason I say to you, do not be worried about your life, as to what you will eat or what you will drink; nor for your body, as to what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing?’” (Matthew 6:25).

Worry is the opposite of contentment, which should be a believer’s normal and consistent state of mind. You should be able to say with Paul, “I have learned to be content in whatever circumstances I am. I know how to get along with humble means, and I also know how to live in prosperity; in any and every circumstance I have learned the secret of being filled and going hungry, both of having abundance and suffering need” (Phil. 4:11–12).

A Christian’s contentment is found only in God—in His ownership, control, and provision of everything we possess and will ever need. Since God owns everything, what we now have and what we will ever have belongs to Him.

Daniel understood the Lord’s control of everything: “Let the name of God be blessed forever and ever, for wisdom and power belong to Him. It is He who changes the times and the epochs; He removes kings and establishes kings; He gives wisdom to wise men and knowledge to men of understanding” (Dan. 2:20–21).

And if we hadn’t heard it from Daniel, we should know it from one of the ancient names of God—Jehovah-Jireh, which means, “the Lord who provides.”

Whatever the Lord gives us belongs to Him. Therefore, it is our responsibility to thank Him for it and to use it wisely and unselfishly for as long as He entrusts us with it.

Ask Yourself

What keeps “enough” from being enough for us? How do we define the level of property or possessions we need in order to feel satisfied with our supply? Why are these measurements so often faulty and skewed away from sound biblical understanding?

Please take the time to visit Grace to You.
You’ll find a wealth of information, sermons, videos, freebies
and items for sale in their shop.


From Daily Readings from the Life of Christ, Vol. 1, John MacArthur. Copyright © 2008. Used by permission of Moody Publishers, Chicago, IL 60610
,www.moodypublishers.com.

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How to Be Content

Have you wondered how it is possible to be content in this chaotic, sin-sick world? This is a wonderful piece by Sam Storms. Please visit his Enjoying God blog to read more great articles.

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The Secret of Spiritual Contentment

By Sam Storms

What could the Apostle Paul possibly mean when he says that he has “learned” to be “content” in whatever circumstance or situation he’s in? Here is what he writes:

“I rejoiced in the Lord greatly that now at length you have revived your concern for me. You were indeed concerned for me, but you had no opportunity. Not that I am speaking of being in need, for I have learned in whatever situation I am to be content. I know how to be brought low, and I know how to abound. In any and every circumstance, I have learned the secret of facing plenty and hunger, abundance and need. I can do all things through him who strengthens me” (Phil. 4:10-13).

Key verse from this article:

The issue for us all is resting and rejoicing in Jesus to such an extent that neither poverty nor prosperity has any affect on us, whether for good or ill.

Read the rest here.

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The Good Old Days

In keeping with my 2013 enough theme, today’s post is taken from The God of All Comfort: Devotional of hope for those who chronically suffer, by my friend, Judy Gann. This book was published in 2005 and I believe this particular devotional will shed more light on my journey with chronic pain illnesses.

Judy and I met in 2003 at the annual Christian Writers’ Conference in Mt. Hermon, which is outside Santa Cruz, California. We got to know each other a bit as we shared our personal and writing stories. Later on, she asked me if she could use some of my story in a book of devotions she was writing, and I said yes.

Side note: the following devotional refers to Rick’s and my wedding taking place in a sanctuary, but we were actually married in the beautiful home of my close friends, Donna and Dub Baker. Here is a photo from that special evening. Those are my children, Alan and Kathy, with us in the photo.

Wedding photo w-Kathy&Alan

The God of All Comfort is a wonderful book filled with devotions describing people who live with chronic illness with comfort and joy because of their faith, hope and trust in Jesus Christ.

Please visit Judy’s site to read more about her and her writing projects.

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The Good Old Days

For I have learned to be content whatever the circumstances. I know what it is to be in need, and I know what it is to have plenty. I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want. —Philippians 4:11-12

Rick and Anna stood at the altar, surrounded by family and friends. As they exchanged marriage vows, their future seemed as bright as the candlelight illuminating the sanctuary.

Two years later, the onset of Anna’s troubling physical symptoms cast a shadow over their plans. Assaulted by muscular pain, most days, Anna’s energy reserves wavered between low and empty. Although the diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia gave a name to her symptoms, Anna’s fragile health encroached on the life she and Rick had envisioned.

Soon, Anna yearned for the “good old days.” She craved the limitless energy she’d enjoyed only a few years earlier. Anna’s mind churned. I wish Rick had known the younger, healthier Anna.

The apostle Paul was familiar with the “good old days” syndrome. Surely in the midst of beatings, shipwrecks, hunger, thirst, and imprisonment, Paul indulged in moments of discontent. Contentment wasn’t an automatic response for Paul—something he could muster up for himself.

Good-Old-Days

In Philippians 4:11, Paul stated that he “learned to be content” through the experiences God allows in his life. Bombarded with difficulties, he realized that circumstances do not define contentment. Paul’s secret for true contentment of the heart was found in his relationship with Christ. In Christ, Paul found the strength to accept and meet the challenges of each situation. Regardless of the circumstances, for Paul, Christ was enough.

The Lord taught Anna lessons in contentment, too. The words of her favorite Scripture verse, “Trust in the Lord with all your heart” (Proverbs 3:5-6), gave Anna the courage to embrace the reality of her “now.” As she trusted in the Lord, she gained a new appreciation for all she and Rick possessed in Christ. A thankful heart and trust in the Lord’s sufficiency replaced dwelling on her life before the illness.

Unfilled longings are scattered across this imperfect, earthly life. Living with illness is a harsh reality. But as we find out sufficiency in Christ and not in our circumstances, we will experience true contentment. Contentment far richer than we had in the “good old days.”

Lord, thank you that you are sufficient for every need. Sick or well, may I, like Paul, find contentment in you.

1Tim-6-6

“Godliness with contentment is great gain.” –1 Timothy 6:6


[From The God of All Comfort. Copyright © 2005 Living Ink Books, an imprint of AMG Publishers]

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