Doubting Thomas?

Doubting Thomas?

By Pat Knight

Thomas replied, “Unless I see the nail marks in his hands and put my finger where the nails were, and put my hand into his side, I will not believe it.”

─John 20:25

On Easter Sunday evening, “When the disciples were together with the doors locked for fear of the Jewish leaders, Jesus came and stood among them and said, ‘Peace be with you!’ After this he showed them his hands and side. The disciples were overjoyed when they saw the Lord” (John 20:19-20). At first the disciples were paralyzed with fear, but Jesus reassured them, “Why are you troubled and why do doubts rise in your minds? Look at my hands and my feet. It is I myself! Touch me and see; a ghost does not have flesh and bones, as you see I have. When he had said this, he showed them his hands and feet. And while they still did not believe it because of joy and amazement, he asked them, ‘Do you have anything to eat?’ They gave him a piece of broiled fish and he took it and ate it in their presence” (Luke 24:38-43), demonstrating that He had a functioning physical body that desired food.

The disciple Thomas was absent from the group on the evening following Jesus’ resurrection. When his fellow disciples relayed to Thomas, “‘We have seen the Lord,’” Thomas replied, “‘Unless I see the nail marks in his hands and put my finger where the nails were, and put my hand into his side, I will not believe it’” (John 20:25).

The following week, when Thomas was gathered with the disciples, Jesus again appeared to them through locked doors, then focused His attention on Thomas. “‘Put your finger here; see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it into my side. Stop doubting and believe’” (John 20:27), an admonition which also applied to future believers. Jesus was patient and merciful to allow Thomas the same opportunity to feel His scars as He had provided the other disciples the previous week. Immediately, Thomas confessed a climactic, credible confession, “‘My Lord and my God!’” (v.28).

We have no indication that Thomas touched his Lord’s wounds. It wasn’t necessary; Thomas instantly recognized his Master—His voice, His authority, His love. Jesus tenderly and compassionately meets the honest doubts of believers. As with Thomas, He willingly provides proof without criticism. Often during a period of doubt in our lives, we are led to new spiritual enlightenment. It is important that we allow doubt to function positively to develop our faith in the sovereign Lord. “Do not fear the reproach of men or be terrified by their insults” (Isaiah 51:7b).

God is compassionate toward a believer who seeks self-knowledge and the help only He can provide. Our Lord will supply answers through His Word, Christian literature, church sermons, and other Christians. His resources are unlimited, His love unfathomable. However, if the doubt aimed toward God is accusatory or tainted with unbelief, God will not respond. Faith involves submission, humility, and an open mind of belief in our Lord alone. “Let us hold unswervingly to the hope we profess, for he who promised is faithful” (Hebrews 10:23).


God is a friend of believers, and He desires that we communicate with Him in that capacity. Are your prayers as natural with Jesus as conversation with an earthly friend? Our relationship with our Lord must be forthright and sincere, with our hearts consistently abiding in Him, searching God’s guidance and wisdom, absolutely convinced He will respond. “Ask boldly, believing without a second thought. People who ‘worry their prayers’ are like wind-tossed, whipped waves. Don’t think you’re going to get anything from the Master that way, adrift at sea, keeping all your options open” (James 1:6-8, The Msg.). The nautical comparison conjures images of believers tossed by waves of doubt.

Jewish rulers of the synagogue clamored for increasingly more proof that Jesus was the Son of God. Daily they witnessed His miracles of teaching and healing, but their doubt and suspicion only multiplied. Jesus refused to perform miracles on demand. He was all too familiar with hardened hearts, those unwilling to believe despite the evidence that convinces a receptive, pliable spirit.

Through the centuries since Thomas lived, he has been encumbered with an unmerited moniker as if he were the only doubter in history. Incredibly, there is an entry in our contemporary dictionaries for “doubting Thomas”, defined as an habitually doubtful person. Nowhere in God’s Word is Thomas identified as a repetitive doubter, aside from the single incident when Thomas sought confirmation that Jesus was the risen Lord, the same evidence afforded the other disciples a week earlier. Jesus didn’t rebuke His disciple, but patiently, lovingly offered Thomas the proof he was seeking.

Every life is more significant than to reduce the sum of it to one experience. Society has judged Thomas harshly and permanently. It causes me to wonder the reason Thomas was specifically singled out as a doubter when the doubt and unbelief of other characters in God’s Word had far-reaching consequences. Would any of us appreciate having our lives defined by one lapse of faith? God’s lack of spiritual censure assures us of His mercy and understanding.

Zachariah and Elizabeth were childless, a major disappointment in their lives, particularly disgraceful for a Hebrew woman. One day while performing his priestly duties at the temple, an angel appeared to Zachariah. “‘Your prayer has been heard. Your wife, Elizabeth, will bear you a son, for he will be great in the sight of the Lord’” (Luke 1:13, 15a). Zachariah asked the angel, “‘How can I be sure of this? I am an old man and my wife is well along in years’” (v.18)? Even though the angel had been sent from God in heaven and had promised the most fabulous gift of their lifetime, Zachariah wanted more proof. His doubt overshadowed his belief. Thus, the angel struck Zachariah mute “‘because you did not believe my words which will become true at their appointed time’” (v.20). The future father was temporarily punished for his lack of convictions. Unbelief is blind and dumb, as illustrated by Zachariah’s lack of verbal communication until the day of John’s birth. Zachariah, a priest, who prayed at the altar of God for a child, questioned whether God’s answer was reliable.

Do we ever pray as Zachariah did, asking God for something specific, but not fully believing our request will be answered? Let us reflect on the belief in our hearts before we pray, to ascertain if we possess tenacious faith anchored in Jesus.

Following Jesus’ ascension, Thomas, like the other disciples, took the Good News of the Gospel into the known world of their time. With courage and convictions, Thomas planted churches in India, establishing Christianity that still survives today in a predominantly Muslim country, and there he was martyred. We owe a great deal to Thomas, who teaches believers by example that Jesus is not threatened by our sincere questions. He welcomes honest, searching inquiries that fuel our daily journey, as we reach out to touch and to be touched by Jesus’ nail-scarred hands. Then we know with certainty what Jesus assured. “‘See, I have engraved you on the palms of my hands’” (Isaiah 49:16).


All Bible references are taken from the NIV unless otherwise indicated.

The Saga of the Four Chaplains

This is my annual post about some very courageous men. 75 years ago today, four Army chaplains committed an amazing act of faith, courage and bravery that has never been forgotten.

Although the Distinguished Service Cross and Purple Heart were later awarded posthumously Congress wished to confer the Medal of Honor but was blocked by the stringent requirements which required heroism performed under fire. So a posthumous Special Medal for Heroism, The Four Chaplains’ Medal, was authorized by Congress and awarded by the President on January 18, 1961.

It was never given before and will never be given again. 

This story is definitely worth reading!

On Feb. 3, at 12:55 a.m., a periscope broke the chilly Atlantic waters. Through the cross hairs, an officer aboard the German submarine U-223 spotted the Dorchester.

The U-223 approached the convoy on the surface, and after identifying and targeting the ship, he gave orders to fire the torpedoes, a fan of three were fired. The one that hit was decisive–and deadly–striking the starboard side, amid ship, far below the water line.

Captain Danielsen, alerted that the Dorchester was taking water rapidly and sinking, gave the order to abandon ship. In less than 20 minutes, the Dorchester would slip beneath the Atlantic’s icy waters.

Tragically, the hit had knocked out power and radio contact with the three escort ships. The CGC Comanche, however, saw the flash of the explosion. It responded and then rescued 97 survivors. The CGC Escanaba circled the Dorchester, rescuing an additional 132 survivors. The third cutter, CGC Tampa, continued on, escorting the remaining two ships.

Read the entire story here.

Strengthen your #Faith

There is a great question and answer section on Billy Graham’s site titled Answers. Today’s post is from there and is an excellent reminder for all of us.

Q: I admit my faith is weak, but I know it would be strong if I could only see Jesus with my own eyes, even for just one minute. Why shouldn’t I ask God to do this for me?

A: God has already given you everything you need to make your faith stronger. Instead of praying for Jesus to appear to you somehow (which He never promised to do), you should be praying instead for the discipline to use the means He has given you to strengthen your faith. Jesus said, “Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have believed” (John 20:29).

I often think of the similarity between physical strength and spiritual strength. What do we need to stay physically strong and healthy? We need two things: food and exercise. If we don’t eat, we’ll grow weaker, waste away and eventually die. And if we don’t exercise, we’ll also grow weak and won’t be useful or helpful to others.

Read the rest here.

Enduring Love

February is traditionally the month of celebrating love. The following is the love story of a very close friend and a wonderful way to end this love month!

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Enduring Love

Boarding the Greyhound bus late, she observed it was nearly filled to capacity with cramped travelers. As she stood at the front of the bus scanning the interior, her gaze identified only one empty seat remaining. Reeling as the bus pulled out of the station into traffic, she quickly slid into the vacant space.  She gave a perfunctory nod to the man sitting in the window seat who was preoccupied reading a book. With the dim overhead reading light shining directly on his head, she dismissed him as bald, and assumed he was elderly.

Silence reigned between the two people for much of the journey. Then at one point when she shifted her position, their eyes met. In the astonishing moment that followed, she felt a spark of attraction toward the handsome stranger with closely cropped blond hair. She mentally reversed her first impression. Names and college information were readily exchanged in the short time remaining. They were both college freshmen in Boston traveling to their separate homes in Maine for their first holiday weekend. She had just enough time to share her reluctance to investigate the city of Boston alone. Reaching her destination first, she departed at the station as the bus lumbered away. Its thick plume of exhaust dispersed in the night air along with any thoughts of a future encounter that may have materialized from the serendipitous meeting with the handsome stranger.

Incredibly, during the following week a letter arrived in her college mailbox from the man she’d met on the bus, inviting her to tour the city of Boston on foot. From that first pedestrian date, their relationship blossomed into a friendship of sharing and caring. Their college years were a whirlwind of fun and exuberant dates; of enviable cultural and educational experiences.

Their friendship gradually transformed into ardent, committed love. The day he proposed marriage and slipped a shimmering diamond ring on her finger, the world was ablaze with irrepressible hope and promise. Their hearts overflowed with ebullient love!

In June they graduated from college and were married. Dreams were fulfilled; prayers answered. Over the ensuing years, people who knew the couple well expressed the unsolicited observation that their marriage was “made in heaven.”

During her first months at college, she had prayed that God would choose her life-long partner. Perhaps her motivation for seeking God’s help was selfish; she likely felt inadequate to make such a monumental life decision herself. It was a tentative act of faith at best, but our Lord honors any amount of trust and reliance, accepting minuscule amounts of sincere faith.

Jesus explained to His disciples, “‘I tell you the truth, if you have faith as small as a mustard seed you can say to this mountain, “move from here to there” and it will move. Nothing will be impossible to you’” (Matthew 17:20, NIV). Jesus was not teaching that His disciples could literally displace mountains, but that when large, looming problems are fully relinquished to the Lord, they are either minimized or resolved when faith is bathed in prayer.

Mustard seeds were some of the smallest known to man in Jesus’ day. When planted, the seed grew into a tall shrub in one season, serving as Christ’s metaphor to illustrate the result of implementing a small amount of faith to gain a large victory. It is God’s desire that our hesitant faith will gradually mature into constant dependence upon Him, no matter how difficult, large, or impossible each situation may seem to us. God is “able to do exceeding abundantly beyond all that we ask or think, according to the power that works within us” (Ephesians 3:20, KJV).

Our Lord is jealous for our exclusive adoration and devotion. With ever increasing amounts of submission and obedience the couple extended toward their Lord, the greater the abundance of joy and peace He heaped upon their marriage. God delighted in their companionship, He lavished them with His redeeming love, and He accepted them as His friends.

God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God and God in him.
In this way, love is made complete” (I John 4:16, NIV)
.

God’s eternal love reaches its full expression on earth through those who believe and serve Him, designating us as His current disciples.

God has been consistently faithful to the couple whose meeting He orchestrated nearly fifty years ago when He answered a dubious prayer. According to His perfect plan, executed in His precise timing, a miraculous introduction of future marriage partners was initiated with coy smiles and whimsical sparks in the improbable environment of a crowded bus cruising the Interstate at 70 mph!  “Nothing, you see, is impossible with God” (Luke 1:37, The Msg.).

Faith vs. fear – what does the Bible say?

Another good one from GotQuestions?

Faith vs. fear –
what does the Bible say?

Answer: Faith and fear cannot exist together. Faith is described in Hebrews 11:1 as being “certain of what we do not see.” It is an absolute belief that God is constantly working behind the scenes in every area of our lives, even when there is no tangible evidence to support that fact. On the other hand, fear, simply stated, is unbelief or weak belief. As unbelief gains the upper hand in our thoughts, fear takes hold of our emotions. Our deliverance from fear and worry is based on faith, which is the very opposite of unbelief. We need to understand that faith is not something that we can produce in ourselves. Faith is a gift (Ephesians 2:8-9) and is described as a fruit (or characteristic) which is produced in our lives by the Holy Spirit (Galatians 5:22). The Christian’s faith is a confident assurance in a God who loves us, who knows our thoughts and cares about our deepest needs. That faith continues to grow as we study the Bible and learn the attributes of His amazing character. The more we learn about God, the more we can see Him working in our lives and the stronger our faith grows.

A growing faith is what we desire to have and what God desires to produce in us. But how, in day-to-day life, can we develop a faith that conquers our fears?

Read the rest here.