Jesus the Son of God—Part 3

Sharing Part 3 of this series today from Unlocking the Bible. You can read Part 1 here, and Part 2 here.

Jesus the Son of God—Part 3

By Colin Smith

It is important to observe that “Son of God” when it is applied to Jesus means something quite different from “sons of God” elsewhere in Scripture (e.g., Job 1:6; Mat. 5:9; Rom. 8:14). So how is Jesus’ identity as the Son of God unique?

Our Lord refers to himself as the Son
“No one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him” (Mat. 11:27).

The Scriptures refer to Jesus as the only Son
“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life” (John 3:16).

There is a great difference between the sonship of Jesus, who has always been the Son of God by nature, and the way in which we become the children of God through adoption by grace: “To all who did receive him … he gave the right to become children of God” (John 1:12).

Read the rest here.

Jesus the Son of God—Part 2

Sharing Part 2 of this series today from Unlocking the Bible. You can read Part 1 here.

Jesus the Son of God—Part 2

By Colin Smith

“Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house?” Luke 2:49

In these first recorded words of Jesus, he speaks of God as “my Father.”

Jesus spoke about God as his Father in a way that was quite different from the way any worshiper would speak of God. This difference was quite clear to the Jewish leaders who heard Jesus speak. John tells us that they wanted to kill Jesus because he was “calling God his own Father, making himself equal with God” (John 5:18).

There is a special intimacy about the way Jesus addresses God as his Father. We see it in the Garden of Gethsemane: “My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will” (Mat. 26:39). And we see it when he is nailed to the cross: “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do” (Luke 23:34).

Read the rest here.

Jesus the Son of God—Part 1

Sharing today from Unlocking the Bible.

Jesus the Son of God—Part 1

By Colin Smith

Not only is Jesus Christ the Lord, the Savior, the Messiah, the Redeemer, and the King, but he is these things precisely because he is the Son of God.

1. It was the first announcement of who Jesus is.
The angel says to Mary, “The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you; therefore the child to be born will be called holy—the Son of God” (Luke 1:35).

2. It was confirmed from heaven at Jesus’ baptism.
A voice from heaven said, “This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased” (Mat. 3:17).

Read the rest here.

Waiting for our Savior Jesus Christ

But as for me, I will watch expectantly for the LORD;
I will wait for the God of my salvation.
My God will hear me.
—Micah 7:7

What a wonderful example the prophet Micah is to us! As one of the minor prophets, the first few chapters of his short Old Testament book are messages of God’s judgment on Samaria and Jerusalem. But toward the end of this book, we see clear evidence of Micah’s faith and confidence that God would send a Savior.

We humans think we’ve got all the answers. And even when we don’t, we have the technology to find those answers in an instant by searching the internet for whatever may be baffling or confusing to us.

Because of the huge advancements in technology over the past few years, many people today believe that the Old Testament is irrelevant in this modern world. However, the Old Testament is filled with verses which talk about a Savior or foretell His coming. Here are only a few:

  • You faithfully answer our prayers with awesome deeds, O God our savior. You are the hope of everyone on earth, even those who sail on distant seas.
    —Psalm 65:5
  • It will become a sign and a witness to the LORD of hosts in the land of Egypt; for they will cry to the LORD because of oppressors, and He will send them a Savior and a Champion, and He will deliver them. —Isaiah 19:20
  • Yet I have been the LORD your God since the land of Egypt; and you were not to know any god except Me, for there is no savior besides Me. —Hosea 13:4

 Read the longing in these and many other verses. These men yearned for the Savior of the world to come soon, and exhibited great faith that it would happen. They obviously loved God without restraint and absolutely believed that God would send a Savior, someone who would rescue them from themselves and their sins and provide a way for them to live with and worship God forever.

So many people say they believe in God but when it comes to eternal issues, they are floundering in a huge sea of doubt and frustration. It is understandably difficult to believe in a being we cannot see. On top of that uncertainty, we are asked to trust that believing in Jesus Christ as our Savior is the only way to heaven.

I love what J. Vernon McGee has to say about this:

You may think you have your way of salvation, but God is the only Savior, and He is the only one who can offer you a plan of salvation.

God’s plan for our salvation was always in the works but was truly fulfilled with the birth of Jesus Christ, His Son. Jesus was born a human and lived an earthly life so that He could experience and relate to every single thing we go through.

The birth of Jesus Christ paved the way for His death on the cross, where He took our sins upon Himself and died on our behalf. That death paved the way for Him to be resurrected from the dead on the third day, proving that death and sin have no more eternal hold on us. All this to show how much God loves us and longs for us to live in heaven with Him forever.

This is where faith and trust come into the picture. We must believe that our only chance for eternal redemption comes from Jesus Christ and has nothing to do with ourselves or what we do or don’t do:

Jesus said to him,
“I am the way
and the truth, and the life;
no one comes to the Father but through Me.”

—John 14:6

Sadly, though, too many of us seem unable to take that giant leap of faith and trust:

He was in the world,
and the world was made through Him,
and the world did not know Him.
He came to His own,
and those who were His own did not receive Him.

But as many as received Him,
to them He gave the right to become children of God,
even to those who believe in His name, who were born,
not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man,
but of God.
—John 1:10-13

Beloved, Christmas is definitely a time of celebration. If you take away all the glitter, packages, decorations, baked goodies and music, we still have the greatest thing for which to be thankful. We celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, the One whom God sent to free us from the bondage of sin.

So if all you have to celebrate Christmas with is that certain knowledge of the saving grace of Jesus Christ, then you have it all and more!

Let’s try to remember that Christmas is more about the Reason and less about the Season.

A very Merry and Blessed Christmas to all of you!

And the Word became flesh, and dwelt among us,
and we saw His glory, glory as of the only begotten from the Father,
full of grace and truth.
John testified about Him and cried out, saying,
“This was He of whom I said, ‘He who comes after me
has a higher rank than I, for He existed before me.’
For of His fullness we have all received,
and grace upon grace.”
—John 1:14-16

 … for today in the city of David
there has been born for you a Savior,
who is Christ the Lord.
—Luke 2:11

Why Jesus Was Hated and Put to Death {Repost}

This is a wonderful article about Kevin DeYoung’s blog post, “Why Did They Hate Jesus?” by Randy Alcorn on his Eternal Perspective Ministries blog.

Why Jesus Was Hated and
Put to Death

By Randy Alcorn

I’ve shared before my appreciation for pastor and writer Kevin DeYoung’s blog, as well as for his books, including The Hole in Our Holiness, What Does the Bible Really Teach about Homosexuality?, and his children’s book The Biggest Story.

With Good Friday and Easter upon us, Kevin recently posted an answer to the question, “Why did they hate Jesus?” It’s common to hear people focus solely on the compassion and love of Jesus, and neglect the other parts of His character, including His holiness and wrath, sovereignty and lordship. Jesus was indeed a friend of sinners, but He was crucified for much more than that. The gentle, compassionate Jesus is also the Jesus who drove the merchant-thieves from the Temple and spoke condemnation against self-righteous religious leaders. Were Jesus as meek and mild and utterly tolerant as many think, He never would have been crucified. But His less popular qualities so outraged people that they nailed Him to a cross.

Read the rest here.

Why Jesus Was Hated and Put to Death

This is a wonderful article about Kevin DeYoung’s blog post, “Why Did They Hate Jesus?” by Randy Alcorn on his Eternal Perspective Ministries blog.

Why Jesus Was Hated and
Put to Death

By Randy Alcorn

I’ve shared before my appreciation for pastor and writer Kevin DeYoung’s blog, as well as for his books, including The Hole in Our Holiness, What Does the Bible Really Teach about Homosexuality?, and his children’s book The Biggest Story.

With Good Friday and Easter upon us, Kevin recently posted an answer to the question, “Why did they hate Jesus?” It’s common to hear people focus solely on the compassion and love of Jesus, and neglect the other parts of His character, including His holiness and wrath, sovereignty and lordship. Jesus was indeed a friend of sinners, but He was crucified for much more than that. The gentle, compassionate Jesus is also the Jesus who drove the merchant-thieves from the Temple and spoke condemnation against self-righteous religious leaders. Were Jesus as meek and mild and utterly tolerant as many think, He never would have been crucified. But His less popular qualities so outraged people that they nailed Him to a cross.

Read the rest here.

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