A Happy and Blessed Resurrection Sunday!

Sharing today from Got Questions?

Question: “Where does the saying ‘He is risen; He is risen, indeed’ come from?”

Answer: A traditional Easter greeting in the Western church is the exclamation “He is risen!” and the traditional response is “He is risen, indeed!” The words are sometimes accompanied by the exchange of three kisses on alternate cheeks, depending on the church. In the Orthodox and Catholic churches, the greeting is called the “Paschal greeting” and is a very old custom.

The greeting is ultimately based on Luke 24:34. Translations throughout church history, from the Latin Vulgate (c. AD 400) to the ESV (2001) have translated this verse nearly identically: “The Lord has risen indeed, and has appeared to Simon!” (ESV). Exactly how the saying became a standard greeting in the church is not known, although there are various theories regarding how it came into common usage.

We do know that, at first, the greeting was more common in Eastern and Byzantine liturgies than in the Western church. There is a tradition in the Eastern Orthodox Church that the saying was made popular by Mary Magdalene when she supposedly addressed Emperor Tiberius in Rome with the words “Christ is risen.”

Using this address should be more than an empty tradition. The words “He is risen!” remind us of the joyous news we celebrate at Easter, that Jesus’ death was not in vain, and that He has the power to overcome death. Saying “He is risen!” allows us to share this incredible truth with each other. The resurrection of Christ gives us hope for salvation and for our own resurrection and eternal life.

So they rose up that very hour and returned to Jerusalem,
and found the eleven and those who were with them gathered together, saying,
“The Lord is risen indeed, and has appeared to Simon!”
—Luke 24:33-34

Beloved, Jesus IS our Resurrection HOPE!!! He rose from the dead so that those who trust in His saving grace can enjoy life everlasting in heaven with Him. Hallelujah!

The following song “Christ Our Hope in Life and Death” by Getty Music attests to the faithfulness of Jesus Christ. He deserves every bit of our thankfulness, praise and worship. Yes, and all glory should go to Him who loves us and has freed us from our sins by shedding His blood for us.

If you cannot view the video for whatever reason, go here to read the beautiful lyrics (scroll down the page a bit).

Live Happily Ever After

Live Happily Ever After

By Pat Knight

As young children, many sat cuddled with a person who read to them from a book of vividly illustrated fairy tales. Though a portion of the stories were frightening, the child snuggled with someone loved and trusted. Fairy tales encompass mystery and danger, the struggle of good and evil, and the triumph of right over wrong. The stories are fictional, interwoven with moral conflict. A hero or heroine is propelled into unsuspecting, treacherous situations, from where a rescuer mysteriously saves the day. The drama is typically summarized: and they all lived happily ever after.

Authors of children’s stories weren’t the first to introduce tales with happy endings. At creation, God embedded the capacity for eternity in every human heart. Each of us was created with the yearning of a future life in heaven. “He {God} has set eternity in the human heart” (Ecclesiastes 3:11). For those who accept Jesus’ gift of salvation, the forgiveness and grace that He secured by His crucifixion and resurrection, our earthly lives will be a mere drop in the bucket of time compared with life everlasting. In that respect, “they lived happily ever after” is realistically and personally applied to those who know Jesus intimately.

Life in heaven will be so incredibly opulent, we have no words in our vocabulary with which to describe it accurately. The Apostle John, personally viewed scenes of heaven, and was charged with recording the details in God’s Word. John often lacked the appropriate words to express sufficiently that which was revealed to him. However, the apostle recorded enough information to cause further longing for life in our heavenly home. God specifies there will be no sadness or suffering there. “He {God} will wipe away every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away” (Revelation 21:4). In heaven, there will be no hospitals, pharmacies, funeral homes, or homeless shelters; no need for 911 systems, governments, or police. Everyone will be whole and holy; goodness and purity will prevail.

Life in heaven will be so incredibly opulent, we have no words in our vocabulary with which to describe it accurately. The Apostle John, personally viewed scenes of heaven, and was charged with recording the details in God’s Word. John often lacked the appropriate words to express sufficiently that which was revealed to him. However, the apostle recorded enough information to cause further longing for life in our heavenly home. God specifies there is no sadness or suffering there. “He {God} will wipe away every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away” (Revelation 21:4). In heaven, there are no hospitals, pharmacies, funeral homes, or homeless shelters; no need for 911 systems, governments, or police. Everyone is whole and holy; goodness and purity prevail.

Our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, reigns in excellence, transcending all the glory, honor, and pageantry we’ve known on earth. “The heavens, even the highest heaven, cannot contain you {God}” (1 Kings 8:27b). Our Lord is confined by neither time nor space. He shall rule supremely forevermore.

Heaven is free of hardship, disease, quarrels, or rivalry. There resides no competition for love or attention. Mankind co-exists in perfect peace. Neither floods nor natural disasters occur. ”The cow will graze near the bear. The cub and the calf will lie down together. The lion will eat hay like a cow. The baby will play safely near the hole of a cobra. Yes, a little child will put its hand in a nest of deadly snakes without harm” (Isaiah 11:7-8). Previously poisonous snakes or ferocious, carnivorous animals, serving as playthings for young children, illustrate the tranquility and safety of our heavenly home.

Only in eternity is the finite capable of comprehending the scope of the infinite.

John heard a voice from the heavenly throne exclaiming, “‘Look! God’s dwelling place is now among believers and he will dwell with them. They will be his people, and God himself will be with them and be their God’” (Revelation 21:3). To dwell implies more than a residence. It indicates the permanence of settling down, the way God makes His home in the hearts of believers, and fills them with His purpose.

What God has created in heaven will endure forever. The same is true of our resurrected bodies. Even if we were able to discern John’s descriptions explicitly, our earthly vision of heaven would still be unclear. When I was diagnosed with cataracts in both eyes, my vision gradually grew blurry and colors faded in intensity. Directly after one lens was implanted, I was astounded at the brilliance of the world around me. Even on a cloudy spring day, every object grabbed my visual attention. Birch trees were suddenly bright white instead of the washed-out color that had insidiously crept into my field of vision. Patches of sky were no longer gray, but dazzling blue. My vision had been transformed from barren and blurry to reveal a crisp world ablaze before me.

As believers in Jesus Christ, such will be our reaction to heaven after decades of living in a fallen, failing earth among mortals. Heaven is glorious because God is glorious! “Now we see things imperfectly, like puzzling reflections in a mirror, but then we will see everything with perfect clarity. All that I know now is partial and incomplete, but then we will know everything completely just as God now knows me completely” (1 Corinthians 13:12, NLT). Our perception of heaven is at best cloudy, like blurry vision caused by deteriorating lenses. When we gaze upon King Jesus in our heavenly home, our spiritual vision will be amazingly clear, as if scales were peeled away from our eyes. Until that time, God views us through the lens of Christ’s righteousness; His characteristics infused in our lives through His redeeming sacrifice on the cross. In heaven we shall worship and praise our Savior face to face. What a magnificent promise, full of confident expectation, encouragement, and excitement!

We cherish the assurance of a grandiose and pure life in heaven. Only Christ offers everlasting intimacy and security. Jesus, the carpenter from Nazareth, assures, “‘My Father’s house has many rooms; if that were not so, would I have told you that I am going there to prepare a place for you? And if I go there to prepare a place for you, I will come back and take you to be with me that you also may be there where I am ’” (John 14:2-3). Jesus guarantees an eternity of permanence and glory with Him.

Reflect on one event in your life that created the most ecstasy, the one resplendent scenario you love to replay on your mental movie screen. Then multiply the irrepressible joy you experienced, and you will barely reveal heaven’s bliss. In eternity, there are pleasures forevermore, a paradise heretofore unexposed to humanity.

John teaches that there will be no need for artificial light in the holy city. “They need no lamp nor light of the sun, for the Lord God gives them light” (Revelation 22:5). The Light of the World will be the consummate light of Heaven. God’s glory exclusively illuminates every corner.

The foundations of the city are inlaid with precious gems—turquoise, amethyst, emeralds, topaz, rubies, and sapphires. The streets are constructed of transparent gold, and each of the twelve gates of the city consist of singular pearls (Revelation 21:18-21), elegant and splendiferous!

Heaven will be the reward for believers who have faithfully followed Jesus on this earth, honoring the Lamb’s horrific sacrifice on the cross of Calvary, and His glorious resurrection from the dead, to redeem our sins. Our eternal benefits in heaven will far overshadow any hardships we have suffered on earth, for there we will live happily ever after!

The Hope of the Empty Tomb

Christ’s Resurrection: Our Hope

by Franklin Graham

On the Saturday after Jesus was crucified, His followers must have felt utterly defeated. Meanwhile, the Pharisees felt they had silenced a critic, the Romans felt they had quashed a rebellion, and the governor had washed his hands of the whole affair.

Then Sunday morning dawned, the gravestone was rolled away, and history was turned inside out. The news—Jesus is alive!—was almost too good to be true. Yet it was undeniably true. So true that His disciples dedicated the rest of their lives to telling the whole world the Good News about Jesus Christ.

On the cross, He died for our sins.

In the tomb, He defeated death.

Nowhere else in this sin-sick world can we find such everlasting hope.

Modern medicine is wonderful—almost miraculous sometimes—but doctors will never defeat death. Now, some of us may live to be a hundred or more. … Every day we have on this earth is a gift from God, but ultimately everyone has to be prepared to face death and judgment. Through the triumph of the cross and resurrection, Jesus has already dealt with both of those.

“When you were dead in your sins… God made you alive with Christ” (Colossians 2:13).

Where is your HOPE?

Prayer: Lord, this week, we remember that because of Christ’s death and resurrection, we no longer have to fear death and the grave. Help us to clearly tell others how they, too, can come to You through Jesus’ sacrifice. We pray in Jesus’ name. Amen.


Scripture quotation is taken by permission from The Holy Bible, New International Version, copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc. Used by permission. From Franklin Graham: “Decision” magazine, April 2011, ©2011 BGEA.

[From “Decision” magazine e-devotional]

Key Terms of Salvation in the Bible

Today I’m sharing from The NIV Bible blog.

Key Terms of Salvation
in the Bible

The more one understands the key terms the apostle Paul chose to explain the gospel, the deeper one’s experience will be with the gospel. Paul uses these terms throughout the book of Romans to describe the free gift of salvation and eternal transformation that is available to all who will believe and trust in Jesus for the forgiveness of their sin.

Atonement (Romans 3:25)

“The satisfaction of God’s holy wrath against sin.” The consequence of our sin is the righteous judgment that God will exercise on sinners. By dying in our place and taking our sins on himself, Jesus makes “atonement” for our sin: he satisfies God’s righteous anger against all who believe.

Faith (Romans 1:17)

Meaning “belief” or “trust,” faith is the means by which sinful people come into right standing with God. It is a complete and active trust in Jesus alone for salvation.

Gospel (Romans 1:16)

Literally means “good news” and is the word Paul uses to refer to the message of forgiveness, eternal life and the lordship of Christ.

Grace (Romans 6:14)

“The unmerited favor of God.” This refers to God’s inexplicable and unwarranted giving of good things (especially salvation) to those who could never earn it. There is power for holy living in the grace of God.

Read the rest here.

How Jesus’ Death Proved He Was King

Today I’m sharing from Core Christianity

How Jesus’ Death Proved
He Was King

By S. M. Baugh

In Christ’s earthly ministry, the Jewish people were expecting him to raise an army like any earthly kind would in order to resuscitate the Davidic kingdom (e.g., John 6:15). This was on their minds when Jesus entered Jerusalem in a royal “parousia” mounted on a donkey:

The next day the large crowd that had come to the feast heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem. So they took branches of palm trees and went out to meet him, crying out, “Hosanna! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, even the King of Israel!” And Jesus found a young donkey and sat on it, just as it is written, “Fear not, daughter of Zion; behold, your king is coming, sitting on a donkey’s colt!” (John 12:12-15; emphasis added)

But the kingdom which the Messiah was about to win through conquest (e.g., John 16:33) as he rode into Jerusalem was much, much bigger and far more important than a realm centered in a tiny country on earth. It is a kingdom not of this world (John 18:36), but instead a whole new creation.

Read the rest here.

#Resurrection HOPE in Jesus

Happy Resurrection Day! What a HOPE we have in Jesus Christ our Savior, who rose from the dead so that those who trust in His saving grace can enjoy life everlasting in heaven with Him. Hallelujah!

This was originally published at Today in the Word.

1Thes1-9-10-OpenTomb--AMP

HOPE in Jesus

Read 1 Thessalonians 1:2–10

  His Son from heaven, whom he raised from the dead—
Jesus, who rescues us from the coming wrath. 
1 Thessalonians 1:9–10

 

One biblical scholar describes HOPE this way: “From a biblical perspective, HOPE may be best imaged as a line suspended between past experience of God’s reliability and a future that is still open, a line stretched taut between the reliability and the freedom of Israel’s God.” The greatest demonstration of God’s reliability is Jesus: the Son of God who willingly became fully man, who suffered an unjust death by crucifixion, and who was vindicated by God in the resurrection. What a wonderful example for our own HOPE!

Our reading today is from the introduction of Paul’s letter to the church in Thessalonica. Throughout these verses Paul unpacks the multiplying nature of HOPE in Jesus. The Thessalonians had been persecuted since they had accepted Jesus (v. 6). But despite their suffering, they were enduring “inspired by HOPE in our Lord Jesus Christ” (v. 3). When the Thessalonians looked at Jesus, they saw that He had suffered and been resurrected, and with Him as their model they too could continue to HOPE.

The HOPE of the Thessalonians was inspired by the example of Jesus, and then their own lives and HOPE became encouraging examples for others (v. 7). This is the power of HOPE in Jesus: not only does it strengthen our own endurance in the spiritual life, it also provides a witness of God’s power for others to see.

Finally, notice the specific HOPE in Jesus that produced faithful obedience. The Thessalonians had embraced faith in the living God, and the resurrection of Jesus and the promise of His return and ultimate deliverance to live with Him kept them motivated to love and serve the Lord. Jesus endured suffering—and so did they. Jesus had been resurrected to eternal life—and so would they. What a basis for HOPE!

Apply the Word

The resurrection of Jesus is the foundation for our HOPE—not just the theology we believe but also the HOPE that inspires our daily lives and sustains us in difficult days. Without the resurrection of Jesus, we Christians should be pitied (see 1 Cor. 15:19). But because our HOPE is in Jesus’ victory over death, we know that our work for God is not in vain (1 Cor. 15:58).


All emphasis on the word HOPE is mine.

Something Old, Something New

From GraceThruFaith, Part 1 of 2.

Something Old, Something New

Part 1 of 2 in the series Old and New

From GraceThruFaith

A Bible Study by Jack Kelley


“Sacrifice and offering you did not desire, but a body you prepared for me; with burnt offerings and sin offerings you were not pleased. Then I said, ‘Here I am—it is written about me in the scroll— I have come to do your will, O God.’”
(Psalm 40:6-8, from the Septuagint translation. Attributed to Jesus in Hebrews 10:5-7).

People who don’t think of the Bible as one message for everyone, but see the Old Testament as the part for the Jews while the New testament is the part for the Church miss out on a lot. They don’t see that while the two parts of the Book are obviously different they are also tied together.

The Old Testament explained how the Israelites were supposed to behave while the New Testament takes some of those behavioral imperatives and presents them in the spiritual sense to show us what we’re supposed to believe. If you look closely you’ll find that things that obviously call for external, physical, and national behavior in the Old Testament often become internal, spiritual and personal beliefs in the New.

Read the rest here.

The Gift of Life

John3-16-Calvary--AMP

For God so loved the world
that He gave His one and only Son,
that whosoever believes in Him
shall not perish but have eternal life.
—John 3:16

The Gift of Life

 By Patricia Knight

His weakness was overwhelming; his lack of stamina discouraging; his mental acuity often diminished.  He was advised by his physicians that his one previously functioning kidney was presently the size of a half dollar. For nearly two years, kidney dialysis has maintained his physical life, albeit not one of high quality.

Those of us with healthy kidneys have the benefit of constant filtration of toxins from our blood. The maximum filtration his body received was a grand total of twelve hours during three days of kidney dialysis each week. The dialysis saved his life; an imperfect system at best, though heretofore there had been no alternative.

Just as my brother began to wonder how much longer he could plod along, enduring the ravages of kidney dialysis, a distant relative offered his healthy, compatible organ. It would save my brother’s life. The donor confided his sole purpose for sacrificing his healthy kidney: “to make you happy.”

What a hero! His gift did not come without risks: months of compatibility testing, surgical pain and recovery, and his own unpredictable future health. How do you adequately thank an organ donor for the gift of life? I posed that question to my brother.  He admitted that he is incapable of expressing the gratitude he feels for every new day of life his donor has so unpretentiously and magnanimously provided. To willingly give up a part of one’s body so that another person can live is an incredible, incomparable gift.

Immediately upon awakening from anesthesia after the donor’s kidney was successfully transplanted by a team of surgeons, my brother related that he felt well for the first time in several years. His thought processes were instantly clear; mind and body seemed connected once again. He felt like a healed person even though he knew there would be a period of recovery necessary and a future of taking sophisticated drugs to prevent rejection of another person’s organ now residing in his body.

For God so loved the world that He gave His one and only Son, that whosoever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life (John 3:16).

Rom5-6-Heart-Crosses--AMPWe were lost in sin, wading in selfishness, powerless to help ourselves, when Jesus offered His one unblemished life to cleanse us from all sin and to empower us for life eternal. It wasn’t easy. Jesus was required to temporarily give up His life in glory to be incarnated a man on earth; to feel all our pain, rejection, and hatred. Though still God, He became man and gave up His heavenly life so that we can live abundantly on earth and victoriously forevermore.  “Christ died for the ungodly. Very rarely will anyone die for a righteous man, though for a good man someone might possibly dare to die. But God demonstrates His own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:6-8).  

Jesus Christ’s death on the cross wasn’t a capitulation to the Roman authorities, who forcefully dragged him from an evening of prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane. Jesus asked, “‘Am I leading a rebellion, that you have come out with swords and clubs to capture me?’” Jesus was soon tried on a trumped-up charge, heckled, beaten, and abused. The ultimate cruelty occurred when he was hanged with common criminals to die a heinous death; His innocent flesh nailed to a crudely-hewn, wooden cross, itself a means of torture. He suffered willingly, and joyfully gave His life, fulfilling His purpose for coming to earth. “Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before Him endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God” (Hebrews 12:2). Following His resurrection from the dead, Jesus ascended to rejoin His Father in His glorious heavenly home, sitting at His Lord’s right hand for eternity.

Jesus breathes new life into ours when He lives within our heart. No longer must we lead a fickle, feckless, fearful life. When we gain access to the heavenly Father, our weakness is converted to His strength; we have the capacity to experience peace and joy amidst life’s trials. “Just as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, we too may live a new life” (Romans 6:4).

We are transformed, enlivened, and empowered by the supreme life-giving, life-altering sacrifice of Jesus Christ, our Lord. My brother’s voluntary organ donor exemplifies a marvelous humanitarian giver. He expected nothing in return for his magnanimous act. His unselfish gift has enabled another to live. Jesus set the example nearly two thousand years ago when He sacrificed His perfect life for all the sinners of the world. “God presented Him as a sacrifice of atonement, through faith in His blood” (Romans 3:24).

What higher calling is known among men than to offer part or all of one’s own life for another? It is unparalleled generosity. “Greater love has no one than this, that one lay down his life for his friend” (John 15:13).

Christ’s love for us was not only manifested in His words, but also in His willingness to sacrificially die for us.  

“As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you” (John 15:9). 

It is the ultimate love gift of all time!

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A Feast of #Joy {Repost}

A FEAST OF JOY

by Patricia Knight

Prov15-15-Feast-sm--AMP

“The cheerful heart has a continual feast” (Proverbs 15:15). Joy is a perpetual, delicious smorgasbord of delight, an avalanche of dazzling power that encompasses the heart and soul. Joy is exhilarating, lavishing our lives with zeal. Joy captivates behavior, illuminating a smile or a deep sustained laugh. Body language conveys our emotions with a sparkle in our eyes, spontaneous hand-clapping, or a little jumping up-and-down.

The exchange of wedding vows amplifies hearts with love, flooding them with joy. In such instances, joy owns the gamut of our emotions, rendering us incapable of passively managing surges of jubilation. Because the occasion is so anticipated and celebrated, our hearts stagger under the load, making us feel as if our epicenter of joy will actually implode. The Psalmist expresses it well: “My heart leaps for joy” (Psalm 28:7).

God’s Word is replete with examples of people whose joy knew no bounds even under the most profoundly challenging circumstances. Miriam, sister of Moses, unabashedly rallied the Israeli women to sing, using tambourines and dance to exuberantly express joy and gratitude to the Lord following His miraculous delivery of the Israelites from generations of slavery in Egypt. The women converted their sorrow and mourning into enthusiastic singing to God for His spectacular victory over the pharaoh and the Egyptian army.

David, King of Israel, was ecstatic that the ark of the covenant, the representation of God’s throne on earth, was returned to  Israeli’s possession after many decades of absence following its seizure by the Philistines, who considered it no more than a lucky talisman. Rallying the people in a Jerusalem street parade, “David danced before the Lord with all his might, while he and the entire house of Israel brought up the ark of the Lord with shouts and the sounds of trumpets” (2 Samuel 6:14-15). It was a time of tremendous rejoicing of national impact. David’s dance was one of true worship, explicitly demonstrating extraordinary love for his Lord.

Job, an Old Testament character, was “blameless and upright; he feared God and shunned evil” (Job 1:1). Job’s dilemma still raises the quintessential question of why the righteous suffer. Job was steadfast regarding his innocence, though his friends accused him of liability for his suffering, determined that Job had caused his own demise by sinning. Job’s wife was so repulsed and discouraged with Job’s all-encompassing body sores, she advised Job to curse God and die. Having little hope for a cure and grieving the loss of his ten children and all of his possessions in one day, Job knew his joy could be deferred as he anticipated eternal life in heaven. Thus he admitted, “Then I would still have this consolation—my joy in unrelenting pain” (Job 6:10). In light of heaven, Job could readily rejoice, knowing he had remained true to God throughout his long ordeal on earth.

Paul and Silas were captured by the Roman authorities, then stripped and beaten with a whip made of several strips of leather into which were embedded bone and lead at the end. Once severely flogged with the whip, they were thrown into an inner cell in the dark, dank, malodorous prison with their feet  fastened in stocks. “About midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God and the other prisoners were listening to them” (Acts 16:25). Suddenly a violent earthquake shook the prison, opening the cell doors and loosening prisoners’ chains. The jailer, responsible for all prisoners, was startled from sleep and assumed the prisoners had escaped. Paul and Silas intervened before the jailer committed suicide with his sword,  and presented the Gospel to the jailer and his family. The jailer was then “filled with joy because he had come to believe in God—he and his whole family” (Acts 16:34). What unusual events were set in motion by a God who was honored and worshipped in spite of life-threatening conditions!  When we trust in God, joy reigns supreme, regardless of adverse situations!Jesus-ColorfulCross--AMP

Jesus Christ, the Son of God, is the epitome of joy.  He who was sinless during his entire life on earth, acknowledged His ultimate goal was to glorify His Father by offering His life as a perfect sacrifice, to redeem sinners of this world. When the soldiers burst into Jesus’ reverie of quiet prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane to take Him by force, Jesus succumbed to the Roman authorities, willingly complying with their orders. “Jesus, the Author and Perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him, endured the cross, scorning its shame, and set down at the right hand of God. Consider him who endured such opposition from sinful men, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart” (Hebrews 12:2-3). Jesus obediently chose to die; otherwise no one would have had the power to kill Him.

The peace Jesus exhibited during his brutal trial and agonizing crucifixion ordeal is beyond our finite understanding. Though Jesus was exhausted and hurting on all levels, He rejoiced spiritually because He was accomplishing the goal for which He had given up His glory in heaven for a season to live on earth—that of becoming the perfect sacrificial Lamb to atone for sin. Jesus’ joy was powerful and zealous; the bounds of Christ’s joy were immeasurable.

If the man, Jesus, could prompt any amount of joy while confronting a terrifying, heinous crucifixion, it was only because He spent quality time with His heavenly Father in prayer, who strengthened Jesus’ commitment to His life’s goal. Utter joy is only possible for us because through Jesus’ death and resurrection, He guarantees our inheritance, providing hope for a life of joy on earth and a glorious eternity in heaven.

When Jesus appeared to His followers after his resurrection, He revealed to them the crucifixion wounds in His hands and His side. The disciples were so ecstatic to actually see Jesus alive, their joy was contagious, extending throughout the centuries to our current generation: “Though you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and are filled with an inexpressible and glorious joy” (1 Peter 1:8). Indeed, we are commanded to rejoice. The Apostle Paul, himself frequently plagued with hostility and extreme suffering, taught: “‘Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice!’” (Philippians 4:4). Christ was the source and secret of Paul’s joy.

Phil4-4-PinkPurpleAbstractFlower-smaller--AMPOne of our life’s objectives is irrefutable: we are to be defined by worshipful joy in which God’s entire creation participates. “Let the heavens rejoice, let the earth be glad; let the sea resound, and all that is in it; let the fields be jubilant, and everything in them. Then all the trees of the forest will sing for joy” (Psalm 96; 11-12).  Since all of nature responds to His authority, God accepts joyful worship from everything He creates. On that premise, let us assess the amount of joyous adoration our Redeemer receives from us. “Clap your hands, all you nations; shout to God with cries of joy. How awesome is the Lord Most High, the great King over all the earth” (Psalm 47:1-2).

Joy is not passive, but animated, manifesting praise and thanksgiving. Miriam and David unapologetically sang and danced before God Almighty. Like them, we eagerly worship our Savior, passionately reflecting His character with effervescent expressions of joy. It is God’s desire that we live triumphant lives, for which joy is one of the important components. Jesus said, “‘I have come that they may have life, and that they may have it more abundantly’” (John 10-10, KJV). Let our words and actions be saturated with bountiful joy!

 

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A Feast of Joy

A FEAST OF JOY

by Patricia Knight

Prov15-15-Feast-sm--AMP

“The cheerful heart has a continual feast” (Proverbs 15:15). Joy is a perpetual, delicious smorgasbord of delight, an avalanche of dazzling power that encompasses the heart and soul. Joy is exhilarating, lavishing our lives with zeal. Joy captivates behavior, illuminating a smile or a deep sustained laugh. Body language conveys our emotions with a sparkle in our eyes, spontaneous hand-clapping, or a little jumping up-and-down.

The exchange of wedding vows amplifies hearts with love, flooding them with joy. In such instances, joy owns the gamut of our emotions, rendering us incapable of passively managing surges of jubilation. Because the occasion is so anticipated and celebrated, our hearts stagger under the load, making us feel as if our epicenter of joy will actually implode. The Psalmist expresses it well: “My heart leaps for joy” (Psalm 28:7).

God’s Word is replete with examples of people whose joy knew no bounds even under the most profoundly challenging circumstances. Miriam, sister of Moses, unabashedly rallied the Israeli women to sing, using tambourines and dance to exuberantly express joy and gratitude to the Lord following His miraculous delivery of the Israelites from generations of slavery in Egypt. The women converted their sorrow and mourning into enthusiastic singing to God for His spectacular victory over the pharaoh and the Egyptian army.

David, King of Israel, was ecstatic that the ark of the covenant, the representation of God’s throne on earth, was returned to  Israeli’s possession after many decades of absence following its seizure by the Philistines, who considered it no more than a lucky talisman. Rallying the people in a Jerusalem street parade, “David danced before the Lord with all his might, while he and the entire house of Israel brought up the ark of the Lord with shouts and the sounds of trumpets” (2 Samuel 6:14-15). It was a time of tremendous rejoicing of national impact. David’s dance was one of true worship, explicitly demonstrating extraordinary love for his Lord.

Job, an Old Testament character, was “blameless and upright; he feared God and shunned evil” (Job 1:1). Job’s dilemma still raises the quintessential question of why the righteous suffer. Job was steadfast regarding his innocence, though his friends accused him of liability for his suffering, determined that Job had caused his own demise by sinning. Job’s wife was so repulsed and discouraged with Job’s all-encompassing body sores, she advised Job to curse God and die. Having little hope for a cure and grieving the loss of his ten children and all of his possessions in one day, Job knew his joy could be deferred as he anticipated eternal life in heaven. Thus he admitted, “Then I would still have this consolation—my joy in unrelenting pain” (Job 6:10). In light of heaven, Job could readily rejoice, knowing he had remained true to God throughout his long ordeal on earth.

Paul and Silas were captured by the Roman authorities, then stripped and beaten with a whip made of several strips of leather into which were embedded bone and lead at the end. Once severely flogged with the whip, they were thrown into an inner cell in the dark, dank, malodorous prison with their feet  fastened in stocks. “About midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God and the other prisoners were listening to them” (Acts 16:25). Suddenly a violent earthquake shook the prison, opening the cell doors and loosening prisoners’ chains. The jailer, responsible for all prisoners, was startled from sleep and assumed the prisoners had escaped. Paul and Silas intervened before the jailer committed suicide with his sword,  and presented the Gospel to the jailer and his family. The jailer was then “filled with joy because he had come to believe in God—he and his whole family” (Acts 16:34). What unusual events were set in motion by a God who was honored and worshipped in spite of life-threatening conditions!  When we trust in God, joy reigns supreme, regardless of adverse situations!Jesus-ColorfulCross--AMP

Jesus Christ, the Son of God, is the epitome of joy.  He who was sinless during his entire life on earth, acknowledged His ultimate goal was to glorify His Father by offering His life as a perfect sacrifice, to redeem sinners of this world. When the soldiers burst into Jesus’ reverie of quiet prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane to take Him by force, Jesus succumbed to the Roman authorities, willingly complying with their orders. “Jesus, the Author and Perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him, endured the cross, scorning its shame, and set down at the right hand of God. Consider him who endured such opposition from sinful men, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart” (Hebrews 12:2-3). Jesus obediently chose to die; otherwise no one would have had the power to kill Him.

The peace Jesus exhibited during his brutal trial and agonizing crucifixion ordeal is beyond our finite understanding. Though Jesus was exhausted and hurting on all levels, He rejoiced spiritually because He was accomplishing the goal for which He had given up His glory in heaven for a season to live on earth—that of becoming the perfect sacrificial Lamb to atone for sin. Jesus’ joy was powerful and zealous; the bounds of Christ’s joy were immeasurable.

If the man, Jesus, could prompt any amount of joy while confronting a terrifying, heinous crucifixion, it was only because He spent quality time with His heavenly Father in prayer, who strengthened Jesus’ commitment to His life’s goal. Utter joy is only possible for us because through Jesus’ death and resurrection, He guarantees our inheritance, providing hope for a life of joy on earth and a glorious eternity in heaven.

When Jesus appeared to His followers after his resurrection, He revealed to them the crucifixion wounds in His hands and His side. The disciples were so ecstatic to actually see Jesus alive, their joy was contagious, extending throughout the centuries to our current generation: “Though you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and are filled with an inexpressible and glorious joy” (1 Peter 1:8). Indeed, we are commanded to rejoice. The Apostle Paul, himself frequently plagued with hostility and extreme suffering, taught: “‘Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice!’” (Philippians 4:4). Christ was the source and secret of Paul’s joy.

Phil4-4-PinkPurpleAbstractFlower-smaller--AMPOne of our life’s objectives is irrefutable: we are to be defined by worshipful joy in which God’s entire creation participates. “Let the heavens rejoice, let the earth be glad; let the sea resound, and all that is in it; let the fields be jubilant, and everything in them. Then all the trees of the forest will sing for joy” (Psalm 96; 11-12).  Since all of nature responds to His authority, God accepts joyful worship from everything He creates. On that premise, let us assess the amount of joyous adoration our Redeemer receives from us. “Clap your hands, all you nations; shout to God with cries of joy. How awesome is the Lord Most High, the great King over all the earth” (Psalm 47:1-2).

Joy is not passive, but animated, manifesting praise and thanksgiving. Miriam and David unapologetically sang and danced before God Almighty. Like them, we eagerly worship our Savior, passionately reflecting His character with effervescent expressions of joy. It is God’s desire that we live triumphant lives, for which joy is one of the important components. Jesus said, “‘I have come that they may have life, and that they may have it more abundantly’” (John 10-10, KJV). Let our words and actions be saturated with bountiful joy!

 

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