The Artist’s Palette

The Artist’s Palette

By Pat Knight

Quickly they flutter to earth like thousands of brightly colored confetti pieces. They crunch when we walk, rustle in the wind, and swirl around our feet. Autumn leaves in New England are delightful. The bright reds and oranges, the most brilliant of all, are products of the sugar maple trees. Birches add yellow, while the reddish-brown leaves fall from stalwart oak trees. All of them in an assorted mixture form breathtaking landscapes.

While the leaves remain attached to the branches, iridescent splendor shines a blaze of autumn hues in the sunlight. En masse the foliage creates a surge of brilliant color, while individually the leaves resemble startling tongues of fire. As the leaves dry and float to the ground, they are scattered by autumn breezes. They flail against vertical surfaces, congregate in heaps, and dance in circles, spinning into a mini-twister before collapsing into an exhausted pile. Such provocative scenes awaken the senses during the dramatic transformation into the fall season.

Change may be comforting or threatening depending on circumstances and individual interpretation. When the cool, crisp days and nights of autumn burst on the scene following the suffocating heat of summer, it offers great relief. In that case, transformation is appealing. The phenomena of changing temperature and magnificent foliage is an anticipated ushering in of the fall season of the year. In the Northeast, we experience four distinct seasons. We are accustomed to change. No season lasts longer than a few months before the next one is introduced. It is the variety of seasons that entices many to live in northern states.

Though variation is interesting and often necessary, there are some things we expect to remain constant or immovable. God’s love and sovereignty are steadfast and reliable. “‘I am the Lord. I do not change’” (Malachi 3:6). When God establishes a covenant with man, He always keeps His promise. God cannot transmute His character. He is pure, holy, divine, and powerful.

Though neither God nor His promises vary, He has masterminded the change of seasons. He could have created a colorless transition, but God chose to splash His beautiful palette throughout the earth. Consider His splendor in sunsets, rainbows, rock sculptures, spraying sea mist, purple mountains capped with snow. God has authored natural beauty. “Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of heavenly lights, who does not change like shifting shadows” (James 1:17). Our Lord remains constant, complete, and fulfilled. His character is dependable.

When God commanded Moses to lead the Israelites out of bondage in Egypt, Moses wanted to know whom he should tell his people had sent him on the mission. God’s reply was quick and sure. “‘I AM who I AM. This is what you are to say to the Israelites: I AM has sent me to you’” (Exodus 3:14). God has always existed and always will. He declares, “‘I am the Alpha and the Omega, the First and the Last, the Beginning and the End.’” (Revelation 22:13). In order for God to create the world and everything in it, He existed before the world.

For centuries God promised the Israelites a Savior. When Isaiah 53 was written in approximately 700 BC, the Man of Calvary was described in detail. The people expected their king to reign with power and conquer their enemies in his kingdom on earth. Few believed that the baby born in Bethlehem was the prophesied Messiah. God had kept His Word. His Son brought God’s promised love and saving grace to the world. He preached a personal, innovative Gospel that enraged the legalistic religious leaders. When Jesus professed to be the Son of God, the temple worshippers were infuriated by His claim. They “took him to the brow of the hill on which the town was built, in order to throw Him off the cliff. But, He walked right through the crowd and went on His way” (Luke 4:29).

Denials and persecution of Jesus didn’t change His sovereign status; He remained Lord. Repudiating God’s deity will never alter the fact that He existed before the beginning of time. God is constant, stable, unswerving, and steadfast. In spite of individual disbelief, one day every person shall confess His Lordship. “At the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father” (Philippians 2:10-11).

Throughout Scripture, God affirmed His Son’s authenticity and authority. “For in Christ all the fullness of the Deity lives in bodily form, and you have been given fullness in Christ, who is the Head over every power and authority” (Colossians 2:9). Jesus is our secure, unmovable, unchanging Lord and Savior.

God is an artist, painting both softly muted and brightly sparkling scenery. Daily He changes the pigments on His canvas. Though God makes sweeping modifications of landscape, His character is unchangeable.

“But you, Lord, sit enthroned forever; your renown endures through all generations. You remain the same and your years will never end” (Psalm 102:12, 27). We invest our lives in a God who is forever the same, who keeps His promises, and who desires to live with us forever. “Before the mountains were born or you brought forth the whole world, from everlasting to everlasting you are God” (Psalm 90:2). He is eternal. Because He lives forever, He offers us an identical future. “The gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord” (Romans 6:23b).

With each new day I am more sensitized to my surroundings, attributing their magnificence to God, the creator, artist, and pigment-maker. Encompassed with such visual luxury, I am going to allot more time to appreciate the changing beauty apparent in each new day, confident that Almighty God will never change.

Waiting in Faith, Trust and Hope

Yet those who wait for the Lord will gain new strength;
they will mount up with wings like eagles,
they will run and not get tired,
they will walk and not become weary.

─Isaiah 40:31

Waiting in Faith,
Trust and Hope

You may have noticed that I did not publish any blog posts last week. That’s because of some wonderful news I get to share with you today. Rick and I were in Phoenix because our family has officially increased by two precious babies.

Our journey with twins Austin and Alex began in June 2016 when they were just four months old. They were brought to Alan and Denise (my son and daughter-in-love) through the foster care system. Unsurprisingly we all immediately fell in love with them and have spent the last 33 months hoping, praying and waiting for everything to work out so that Alan and Denise could adopt these sweet little ones. Last week that long-awaited event happened and Rick and I were there at the adoption hearing, along with many family and friends.

I often write about faith, trust and hope. Over the past three years, all of us have been praying and praising God with faith, trust and hope during the waiting. Admittedly there were times when we all wondered if the adoption would ever happen. We repeatedly found ourselves high on the mountains of good news, only to be thrust down into valleys when those hopes were dashed. Still, we continued to rely on God for his comfort and peace while we waited.

Years ago, a fellow writer shared this gem with me about waiting. I have shared his wise words before and they never get old. It definitely applies to our situation:

Even though it was very hard at times to keep on trusting and believing that God was working out the details for the good of all of us, including the babies, we never gave up hope that adoption day would finally happen. The most important thing we learned from everything we went through is that God already had a plan in place, and last week we witnessed the fruition of that plan.

So here we are, almost three years later. Because of the anonymity and protection required for children in the foster care system, we haven’t been able to speak publicly about this … until now.

Oh, dear Lord, this Meemaw is utterly thankful to be able to finally tell how You walked with us through all that waiting. To You—our awesome and everlasting God—be the glory for allowing us to be part of such an amazing journey with these two precious children.

To the King of the ages, immortal, invisible, 
the only God,
be honor and glory forever and ever. Amen.
─1 Timothy 1:17

As I was writing this post, the song To God Be the Glory kept running through my head, so here is a video of Nicole C. Mullen singing My Tribute (To God be the Glory)/My Redeemer Lives:

Glory to God

Glory to God

By Pat Knight

“He will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.  Of the increase of his government there will be no end…The zeal of the Lord will accomplish this” (Isaiah 9:6-7).

Our society is enthralled with current electronic equipment such as computers, cell phones, tablets, and digital cameras, as we impatiently await the discovery of the newest gadget. A university professor who researches such things, sent an e-mail from his home to the college where he works, a mere two miles away. Before the e-mail registered on his work PC, he followed the route of the message with his home computer. As it traveled through several states, it bounced off twenty-one cell towers before reaching its intended final destination two hours later.  As amazed as we are with the latest and greatest electronic devices, they all have their limits.

When you pray, your words are heard instantly in heaven. No bouncing off earthly or heavenly cell towers is necessary. God knows our thoughts even before we utter them.  He listens intently when we approach Him verbally. Have you told God lately how wondrous He is? If we exclaim about the latest electronic development, surely we must express to our Lord His superior and miraculous nature. God is the heavenly Father who promised, and then faithfully orchestrated, the incarnation of Jesus on the starlit night in Bethlehem two thousand years ago.

God performed the only virgin birth ever in the history of mankind. He kept Mary well without prenatal medical care and assured a healthy birth in an age when infant mortality was extremely high. He sent a great choir of angels to earth, specifically to the lowly shepherds tending their flocks in the fields at night, to sing the first Christmas carol, announcing, “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace to men on whom his favor rests” (Luke 2:14). God directed the shepherds to the humble location in Bethlehem to witness the baby Jesus, so they could repeat what they had seen, worshipping God for the greatest miracle of the ages.

God planted a prominent star in the sky, alerting astrologists from the east of the birth of the King. The star eventually led the Magi to the royal family several months after Jesus’ birth, when they presented the family with gold and other gifts, providing financially for them. Once the wise men left, an angel of the Lord forewarned Joseph in a dream that he must move quickly to avoid King Herod’s jealousy for his crown, made apparent by his recent order for his henchmen to kill all the newborn baby boys around Bethlehem. Joseph took his family during the night to Egypt, away from King Herod’s legal jurisdiction.

Christians the world over recognize these historical, supernatural events as part of the Christmas story; a series of miracles surrounding Jesus’ birth, choreographed by the heavenly Father, with every detail fulfilled exactly just as He had promised over the centuries and recorded in His Word.

If ever there were anyone worthy of our awesome, incredible reactions, it is the Lord of Hosts and King of Kings! Let us offer the splendor of our worship to the Messiah this Christmas, as the divine power; the enduring, compassionate provider and protector of His people. The God without limits merits our shouts of joy and adoration for sending the babe of Bethlehem, who joyously offered himself as our Redeemer on the cross of Calvary!

Jesus, the Bright and Morning Star

Jesus, You’re Beautiful by Sara Groves is a lovely song of praise to Jesus that truly touches my heart. Its sweet lyrics are wonderful to sing and easy to remember.

As you listen to this song, thank God for Jesus our beautiful Bright and Morning Star:

12 “And behold, I am coming quickly, and My reward is with Me,
to give to every one according to his work.

13 
I am the Alpha and the Omega,
the Beginning and the End,
the First and the Last.”

14 Blessed are those who do His commandments,
that they may have the right to the tree of life,
and may enter through the gates into the city.

15 
But outside are dogs and sorcerers
and sexually immoral and murderers and idolaters,
and whoever loves and practices a lie.

16 “I, Jesus, have sent My angel
to testify to you these things in the churches.
I am the Root and the Offspring of David,
the Bright and Morning Star.”

17 And the Spirit and the bride say, “Come!”
And let him who hears say, “Come!”
And let him who thirsts come.
Whoever desires, let him take the water of life freely.

—Revelation 22:12-17

If for whatever reason you cannot view this video, you can read the complete lyrics here.

The Virgin Mary had a Baby Boy

Shared from the Grace Thru Faith site.

The Virgin Mary had a Baby Boy

A Bible Study by Jack Kelley

Therefore the Lord Himself will give you a sign. The virgin shall be with child and will give birth to a son, and will call him Immanuel (Isaiah 7:14).

There is perhaps no prophecy in the Old Testament more controversial than this one. Many liberal theologians reject the notion of the virgin birth of Jesus as being simply legend, Jews flatly deny its validity and non-believers scoff at it as the best example of the mindless belief necessary for Christianity to flourish.

Yet a careful study of the history of Israel, the laws of inheritance, and the promises by God to King David lead even the most skeptical student to conclude that Jesus had to be supernaturally conceived to be both God and human, and therefore qualified to redeem mankind, and have a legitimate claim to the Throne of Israel.

The God Man

Jesus had to be God to forgive our sins. No mere human can do that. One of the charges levied against Him was that He committed blasphemy by claiming the authority to forgive us, a power reserved for God alone (Mark 2:1-7). To prove He had that authority, Jesus healed a paralytic (Mark 2:8-12) right before His accusers’ eyes.  The immediate healing was incontrovertible evidence of His authority, derived as a direct descendant of God.

But He had to be human to redeem us. The laws of redemption required that a next of kin redeem that which was lost. (Lev. 25:24-25) This so-called kinsman redeemer had to be qualified, able and willing to perform the act of redemption. When Adam lost dominion over planet Earth and plunged all his progeny into sin, only his next of kin could redeem the Earth and its inhabitants. Since Adam was a human whose Father was God (Luke 3:23-38), only another direct Son of God could qualify. This is why Paul referred to Jesus as the last Adam (1 Cor. 15:45). Since the Laws of sacrifice required the shedding of innocent blood as the coin of redemption, only a sinless man was able (John 1:29-34). Since the kinsman redeemer’s life was required, only someone who loves us the way God does would be willing (John 3:16). This is the real test of the kinsman redeemer. Seeing Jesus as qualified and able to redeem us isn’t a great problem. After all He’s the Son of God. But recognizing that He was also willing to step down from His Heavenly Throne to trade His perfect life for ours should really humble us. What kind of love did it take to voluntarily suffer the pain and humiliation required to redeem us?

Read the rest here.

Radiance of Glory

Radiance of Glory

By Patricia Knight

Following sunrise, when the soft glow of early morning light filters through the labyrinth of tree branches, an ambience of autumn aroma and activity disseminates. Rustled by a gentle breeze, the crisp, dead leaves spontaneously flutter to earth, composing a barely audible tap of percussive rhythm. The Mighty One, God, the Lord, speaks and summons the earth from the rising of the sun to the place where it sets. Perfect in beauty, God shines forth (Psalm 50:1-2).

From a window, I view the close proximity of a border of trees. Brilliant red totally encompasses the maple tree, apparently placed in the front line of duty, embraced on all sides with multi-chromatic hardwood trees; a proliferation of conspicuously sublime rainbow colors. In the immediate foreground, a filigreed, green cedar tree is superimposed on the deeply layered, adorned forest, creating slices of autumn colors in profusion.

In the wide open spaces where hills meet the sky and valleys separate hills, there exists a seasonal panoramic view of the vivid color spectrum of autumn hues proclaimed across wide stretches of geography, affirming that our Creator specializes in magnanimous beauty. The illustrious saturation of colorful hues, like a distant patchwork quilt, is a grandiose proclamation of God’s power and glory. “The mountains and hills will burst into song before you, and all the trees of the field will clap their hands” (Isaiah 55:12), figurative language expressing that God’s creation joins in effervescent praise to celebrate the magnificent beauty with which our Lord surrounds His people in the physical world He designed and created.

Oh, how the Lord lavishes us with His adorning beauty! In the sunlight, God’s sovereign palette accentuates a wide range of flame-colored autumn leaves, which from a distant perspective, appear to mingle with puffy white clouds dancing across the blue sky. God introduces astounding color to our daylight hours, followed by twinkling galaxies of stars draped across a nighttime ebony background. “Be exalted, O God, above the heavens; let your glory be over all the earth” (Psalm 57:5).

God’s visible glory is always described in terms of brightness. Because this world’s beauty authenticates our Creator’s unique signature, all of earth is infused with His glory.

“The land was radiant with his {God’s} glory” (Ezekiel 43:2b).

There is neither time nor place where our Lord’s presence is not manifest in His handiwork. Let us glorify His majestic splendor with our praise of thanksgiving during every season of our lives!

#HOPE Collage

No matter where you live in the United States, you’ve most likely experienced interesting Winter weather. How about a bit of Spring HOPE on this first day of Spring?

The day the Lord created HOPE was probably the same day he created Spring. —Bernard Williams

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Be strong and let your heart take courage,
all you who HOPE in the Lord.
—Psalm 31:24

[All emphasis on the word HOPE is mine.]

Jesus, You’re Beautiful

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I recently heard a song that truly touched my heart. “Jesus, You’re Beautiful by Sara Groves is a lovely song of praise to Jesus, with sweet lyrics that are wonderful to sing and easy to remember.

As you listen to this song, thank God for Jesus our beautiful Bright and Morning Star:

12 “And behold, I am coming quickly, and My reward is with Me,
to give to every one according to his work.

13 
I am the Alpha and the Omega,
the Beginning and the End,
the First and the Last.”

14 Blessed are those who do His commandments,
that they may have the right to the tree of life,
and may enter through the gates into the city.

15 
But outside are dogs and sorcerers
and sexually immoral and murderers and idolaters,
and whoever loves and practices a lie.

16 “I, Jesus, have sent My angel
to testify to you these things in the churches.
I am the Root and the Offspring of David,
the Bright and Morning Star.”

17 And the Spirit and the bride say, “Come!”
And let him who hears say, “Come!”
And let him who thirsts come.
Whoever desires, let him take the water of life freely.

—Revelation 22:12-17

 Please excuse any ads that may appear before the video begins
If for whatever reason you cannot view this video, you can read the complete lyrics here.

Moonbeams

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Moonbeams

By Patricia Knight

“The sun has one kind of splendor, the moon another
and the stars another” (1 Corinthians 15:41).

The surprising advantage of living near a body of water is that whatever action occurs in the sky above—rainbows, storm clouds, or sunsets—often reflect into the mirror calm waters below. Because the two images can be so identical, one might wonder which scene is authentic and which one is an exact likeness.

There are occasions when we perceive we are witnessing the hand of God dipping His brush in His palette of heavenly colors to paint a panoramic view right before our eyes. A tranquil sky with dancing, white, fluffy clouds pierced by a flock of migrating geese; slices of arrow-shaped lightning bolts dividing black thunderheads; a double rainbow that weaves its arc among tall trees; all delight us with reciprocal images in the water. As if God’s beauty isn’t spectacular enough in the sky alone, our Creator pleasures us with simultaneous views in the water.  He alone creates shadows and reflections using variations of light which He spoke into existence at creation when the earth was originally shrouded in darkness (Genesis 1:3).

God made two great lights—the greater light to govern the day and the lesser light to govern the night. He also made the stars. God set them in the expanse of the sky to give light on the earth, to govern the day and the night, and to separate light from darkness” (Genesis 1:16-18).

In the eerie shadows of a late autumn evening, the full moon birthed a celestial reflection of its radiant yellow image in the waters below. The limpid surface was strangely still, interrupted only by random wave movement, causing the moon’s impression to vacillate, alternately dividing into slithering segments, then re-uniting the quivering moonbeams into a lopsided circle.

Ushering in the duplicate full moon image was a dazzling path of moonlight superimposed on the surface of the water, extending like a bridge from one side of the cove to the other. The yellow beam shimmered as the dainty waves rippled in slow motion. Could the iridescence be moon dust directly filtered through the atmosphere from the lunar planet?

Reconfiguring the moon into a large, desultory ball, with segments oozing and bulging as the water gently rocked and rolled, the lake’s version was impressionistic. The original symmetrical roundness of the lunar orb divided irregularly like an onion sliced in random rings. First light, then deep, dark spaces shattered the yellow circle with narrow slivers and wiggly protrusions.

Slicing through the moonlit path emerged a solitary canoeist, a black silhouetted figure in the twilight. The canoeist and his paddle were resting in the stern as the skiff floated freely in the path of the moonbeam. Perhaps the canoeist was overwhelmed by the extravagance of the moment. Soon the craft and paddler were obscured from view, engulfed by the darkness outside the perimeter of the moonlit path.

As the full moon traveled its established orbit in space, the lake’s somewhat distorted, reflected image advanced closer toward the shoreline. While I pondered the unpredictable advance of the oscillating moon replica, it stealthily disappeared from sight. The moon methodically repositioned over the horizon, concluding the nocturnal, whimsical performance of the moon duet. Devoid of celestial light, sky and lake spontaneously merged, lowering a heavy curtain of darkness on the stage of the current night’s performance.

Oh, how magnificent is our Lord, who splashes His brilliant designs throughout our world! He choreographs the change of seasons and pops flowers from underground to bloom in elegant beauty. He crowns majestic mountaintops with melting snow, renewing streams and ponds below. Expansive canyons are formed when God carves out great chunks of earth. He controls the ocean’s waves by adjusting the rhythmic tug of the moon. How majestic is God’s name and greatly to be praised!

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 “The heavens declare the glory of God;
the skies proclaim the work of his hands” (Psalm 19:1).

A Feast of #Joy {Repost}

A FEAST OF JOY

by Patricia Knight

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“The cheerful heart has a continual feast” (Proverbs 15:15). Joy is a perpetual, delicious smorgasbord of delight, an avalanche of dazzling power that encompasses the heart and soul. Joy is exhilarating, lavishing our lives with zeal. Joy captivates behavior, illuminating a smile or a deep sustained laugh. Body language conveys our emotions with a sparkle in our eyes, spontaneous hand-clapping, or a little jumping up-and-down.

The exchange of wedding vows amplifies hearts with love, flooding them with joy. In such instances, joy owns the gamut of our emotions, rendering us incapable of passively managing surges of jubilation. Because the occasion is so anticipated and celebrated, our hearts stagger under the load, making us feel as if our epicenter of joy will actually implode. The Psalmist expresses it well: “My heart leaps for joy” (Psalm 28:7).

God’s Word is replete with examples of people whose joy knew no bounds even under the most profoundly challenging circumstances. Miriam, sister of Moses, unabashedly rallied the Israeli women to sing, using tambourines and dance to exuberantly express joy and gratitude to the Lord following His miraculous delivery of the Israelites from generations of slavery in Egypt. The women converted their sorrow and mourning into enthusiastic singing to God for His spectacular victory over the pharaoh and the Egyptian army.

David, King of Israel, was ecstatic that the ark of the covenant, the representation of God’s throne on earth, was returned to  Israeli’s possession after many decades of absence following its seizure by the Philistines, who considered it no more than a lucky talisman. Rallying the people in a Jerusalem street parade, “David danced before the Lord with all his might, while he and the entire house of Israel brought up the ark of the Lord with shouts and the sounds of trumpets” (2 Samuel 6:14-15). It was a time of tremendous rejoicing of national impact. David’s dance was one of true worship, explicitly demonstrating extraordinary love for his Lord.

Job, an Old Testament character, was “blameless and upright; he feared God and shunned evil” (Job 1:1). Job’s dilemma still raises the quintessential question of why the righteous suffer. Job was steadfast regarding his innocence, though his friends accused him of liability for his suffering, determined that Job had caused his own demise by sinning. Job’s wife was so repulsed and discouraged with Job’s all-encompassing body sores, she advised Job to curse God and die. Having little hope for a cure and grieving the loss of his ten children and all of his possessions in one day, Job knew his joy could be deferred as he anticipated eternal life in heaven. Thus he admitted, “Then I would still have this consolation—my joy in unrelenting pain” (Job 6:10). In light of heaven, Job could readily rejoice, knowing he had remained true to God throughout his long ordeal on earth.

Paul and Silas were captured by the Roman authorities, then stripped and beaten with a whip made of several strips of leather into which were embedded bone and lead at the end. Once severely flogged with the whip, they were thrown into an inner cell in the dark, dank, malodorous prison with their feet  fastened in stocks. “About midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God and the other prisoners were listening to them” (Acts 16:25). Suddenly a violent earthquake shook the prison, opening the cell doors and loosening prisoners’ chains. The jailer, responsible for all prisoners, was startled from sleep and assumed the prisoners had escaped. Paul and Silas intervened before the jailer committed suicide with his sword,  and presented the Gospel to the jailer and his family. The jailer was then “filled with joy because he had come to believe in God—he and his whole family” (Acts 16:34). What unusual events were set in motion by a God who was honored and worshipped in spite of life-threatening conditions!  When we trust in God, joy reigns supreme, regardless of adverse situations!Jesus-ColorfulCross--AMP

Jesus Christ, the Son of God, is the epitome of joy.  He who was sinless during his entire life on earth, acknowledged His ultimate goal was to glorify His Father by offering His life as a perfect sacrifice, to redeem sinners of this world. When the soldiers burst into Jesus’ reverie of quiet prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane to take Him by force, Jesus succumbed to the Roman authorities, willingly complying with their orders. “Jesus, the Author and Perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him, endured the cross, scorning its shame, and set down at the right hand of God. Consider him who endured such opposition from sinful men, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart” (Hebrews 12:2-3). Jesus obediently chose to die; otherwise no one would have had the power to kill Him.

The peace Jesus exhibited during his brutal trial and agonizing crucifixion ordeal is beyond our finite understanding. Though Jesus was exhausted and hurting on all levels, He rejoiced spiritually because He was accomplishing the goal for which He had given up His glory in heaven for a season to live on earth—that of becoming the perfect sacrificial Lamb to atone for sin. Jesus’ joy was powerful and zealous; the bounds of Christ’s joy were immeasurable.

If the man, Jesus, could prompt any amount of joy while confronting a terrifying, heinous crucifixion, it was only because He spent quality time with His heavenly Father in prayer, who strengthened Jesus’ commitment to His life’s goal. Utter joy is only possible for us because through Jesus’ death and resurrection, He guarantees our inheritance, providing hope for a life of joy on earth and a glorious eternity in heaven.

When Jesus appeared to His followers after his resurrection, He revealed to them the crucifixion wounds in His hands and His side. The disciples were so ecstatic to actually see Jesus alive, their joy was contagious, extending throughout the centuries to our current generation: “Though you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and are filled with an inexpressible and glorious joy” (1 Peter 1:8). Indeed, we are commanded to rejoice. The Apostle Paul, himself frequently plagued with hostility and extreme suffering, taught: “‘Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice!’” (Philippians 4:4). Christ was the source and secret of Paul’s joy.

Phil4-4-PinkPurpleAbstractFlower-smaller--AMPOne of our life’s objectives is irrefutable: we are to be defined by worshipful joy in which God’s entire creation participates. “Let the heavens rejoice, let the earth be glad; let the sea resound, and all that is in it; let the fields be jubilant, and everything in them. Then all the trees of the forest will sing for joy” (Psalm 96; 11-12).  Since all of nature responds to His authority, God accepts joyful worship from everything He creates. On that premise, let us assess the amount of joyous adoration our Redeemer receives from us. “Clap your hands, all you nations; shout to God with cries of joy. How awesome is the Lord Most High, the great King over all the earth” (Psalm 47:1-2).

Joy is not passive, but animated, manifesting praise and thanksgiving. Miriam and David unapologetically sang and danced before God Almighty. Like them, we eagerly worship our Savior, passionately reflecting His character with effervescent expressions of joy. It is God’s desire that we live triumphant lives, for which joy is one of the important components. Jesus said, “‘I have come that they may have life, and that they may have it more abundantly’” (John 10-10, KJV). Let our words and actions be saturated with bountiful joy!

 

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