Kids and Kindness

Kids and Kindness 

By Pat Knight

The six-year old was staying overnight at his grandparent’s house. During the night the young man left his bedroom en route to the bathroom. He walked past his grandmother sound asleep on the couch. As he retraced his steps to his bedroom, he halted beside the couch. In hushed tones he spoke, “Nanny, Nanny, I didn’t flush ‘cause I didn’t want to wake you up.” Then, he trudged back to his bedroom, satisfied he had been thoughtful enough to prevent his Nanny from awakening! Meanwhile, Nanny was shaking her head in bewilderment. She wanted to laugh out loud, but in the silence of the night, there was no one awake to listen. She chuckled to herself and fell back to sleep, thanking God for her dear little grandson.

Under the rule of the Pharaoh of Egypt, the Israelites were an oppressed people in a foreign land. They were living as slaves in abject poverty, forced to build cities out of the bricks they made. Their captors were brutal and demanding. Though they were in bondage to Egypt, their numbers continued to grow. Their masters were fearful and threatened by their rising population. Several methods were tried in an attempt to squelch the rapid growth, but when all else failed, the Pharaoh issued a vicious executive order that every Hebrew newborn boy be thrown into the Nile River. (Exodus 1)

Jochebed was a godly Hebrew woman who gave birth to a healthy baby boy, but her great love for her son prevented her from announcing his birth to the authorities. So, she successfully hid him for three months. What a chance she was taking! The Egyptian soldiers regularly patrolled the Israelites’ living area for the sole purpose of confiscating baby boys.

When Jochebed realized she could no longer muffle the loud cries of her infant, she was not going to stand idly by while hateful murderers drowned her child. Jochebed worked tirelessly, fashioning a tightly woven ark out of bulrushes. Meticulously she daubed the exposed seams of papyrus with tar and pitch to prevent water seepage. Because Jochebed loved and trusted her God, He was merciful to her and gradually revealed His plan for saving her son.

Jochebed must have repeatedly rehearsed with her daughter, Miriam, her participation in the plan to save her infant brother. With tremendous faith, the infant’s mother placed him in a little sea-worthy, waterproof ark. It was Miriam’s responsibility to surreptitiously carry the precious bundle to the river. There she found a shallow area in the reeds where she stealthily eased the precious cargo into the water.

There were many dangers inherent in Jochebed’s plans: alligators roamed the waters of the Nile River, an Egyptian soldier could have intercepted Miriam, or the tiny ark could have floated away without discovery. However, faith prevailed. God’s plan was perfect, much larger and involving many more thousands of people than Jochebed could have imagined. “In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps” (Proverbs 16:9). Jochebed was confident that her God would answer her prayers. With innocent faith, she became an important participant in world history.

Miriam closed the lid on her brother’s custom-made houseboat, secretly slipped it into the river, and waited. Soon, the royal participants in the drama arrived. Pharaoh’s daughter and her attendants went to the same secluded shallows of the river to bathe where Miriam had maneuvered the ark into the water. Abruptly, the princess spied the mysterious basket floating among the reeds and instructed her servant to fetch it. When the lid was opened, a beautiful baby was revealed. Although the princess immediately recognized the infant as Hebrew, “he was crying and she felt sorry for him” (Exodus 2:6).

Right on cue, Miriam emerged from hiding, asking Pharaoh’s daughter, “Shall I go and get one of the Hebrew women to nurse the baby for you?” (Exodus 2:7). The princess agreed, ultimately offering the baby’s mother the opportunity to nurse the child and receive payment for her services. What an exceptional reward God granted Jochebed for her faithfulness! She was allowed to serve as surrogate mother to her own son during their bonding years. When her son grew older, Jochebed delivered him to Pharaoh’s daughter, who raised him as her own

“She named him Moses, saying, ‘I drew him out of the water’” (Exodus 2:10).

God had promised His people delivery from slavery; this scene was but a small portion of the plan God chose to liberate nearly a million people. He had selected Moses prior to his birth as the leader of his people. It took many years for God to reveal His plan to Moses, but he eventually became God’s spokesman before Pharaoh, to plead for his countrymen’s release from slavery. 

From the time Moses was born to Hebrew slave parents, there was potential for his life’s plans to fail. Infant mortality was excessively high with soldiers drowning boys in the river. But, when God has a plan, He uses the most unlikely people in the most absurd situations to facilitate His purposes. We have proof that God intervened in the lives of His oppressed people in a miraculous way.

Pharaoh had every intention of eradicating the Israelite nation by attrition; drowning all newborn boys. He did not account for the sensitivity and weakness of his own daughter displayed when she opened Moses’ papyrus basket. She was unwittingly manipulated by God for His purposes. Moses was nurtured by the princess, nourished at the table of kings, educated in progressive Egyptian schools, and protected by their vast army. That baby grew up to save the nation of Israel—a foretaste of the baby of Bethlehem.

How history would have been altered forever if Jochebed had not obeyed her Lord and allowed Him to use her practical trust for His good purposes! God uses each of His believers throughout their lifetime to accomplish His will. God wants us, like Jochebed, to use our common sense, resourcefulness, and intelligence to serve Him. Then, believing that God will use His love and empower us to develop His plan, we march forward in faith, doing what we know God is directing us to do. 

Let my heart be broken with the things that break the heart of God. —Bob Pierce, Founder, World Vision

It is our privilege to respond to the issues that tug on the heart of God. His goals transform to our goals, His priorities become ours, and we develop passion for all of God’s projects. Then we will be prepared for use in accomplishing His goals. 

It was the squealing life of a forbidden Hebrew baby boy who wrenched the love from the heart of the princess. Even the grandchild who was so considerate of his Nanny spoke volumes of love and kindness with his simple act. With his extraordinary sensitivities, he, too, may someday fulfill God’s plan as he learns to trust in Him and give his life for God’s purposes. 

“From the lips of children and infants you have ordained praise” (Psalm 8:2). God may speak to us through our children of lofty purposes we may not recognize in any other way. Let us seek to learn the same innocent and straightforward love children have for Jesus. It will greatly improve our faith and our lives.

How Jesus’ Death Proved He Was King

Today I’m sharing from Core Christianity

How Jesus’ Death Proved
He Was King

By S. M. Baugh

In Christ’s earthly ministry, the Jewish people were expecting him to raise an army like any earthly kind would in order to resuscitate the Davidic kingdom (e.g., John 6:15). This was on their minds when Jesus entered Jerusalem in a royal “parousia” mounted on a donkey:

The next day the large crowd that had come to the feast heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem. So they took branches of palm trees and went out to meet him, crying out, “Hosanna! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, even the King of Israel!” And Jesus found a young donkey and sat on it, just as it is written, “Fear not, daughter of Zion; behold, your king is coming, sitting on a donkey’s colt!” (John 12:12-15; emphasis added)

But the kingdom which the Messiah was about to win through conquest (e.g., John 16:33) as he rode into Jerusalem was much, much bigger and far more important than a realm centered in a tiny country on earth. It is a kingdom not of this world (John 18:36), but instead a whole new creation.

Read the rest here.

#Trust in the Lord … Always {Reblog}

Trust in the Lord with all your heart
and do not lean on your own understanding;
in all your ways acknowledge Him,
and He will make your paths straight.
—Proverbs 3:5-6

Over the years, the Lord has given me several life verses. This Proverbs passage was the first one and is probably dearest to my heart because it was one of the reasons Rick and I started talking online. He and I both cited this passage in our profiles because we both love this verse. And here we are, over 18 years 20 years later, still relying on the verse that brought us together!

El Shaddai: God Almighty {Reblog}

When Abram was ninety-nine years old,
the Lord appeared to him and said,  

“I am El-Shaddai—’God Almighty.’
Serve me faithfully and
live a blameless life.
I will make a covenant with you,
by which I will guarantee to give you
countless descendants.”

—Genesis 17:1-2, NLT

 

If you cannot view this video for any reason, click here to read the lyrics.

#Rescue and #Protect {Reblog}

If you make the Lord your refuge,
    if you make the Most High your shelter,
10 no evil will conquer you;
    no plague will come near your home.
11 For he will order his angels
    to protect you wherever you go.
12 They will hold you up with their hands
    so you won’t even hurt your foot on a stone.
13 You will trample upon lions and cobras;
    you will crush fierce lions and serpents under your feet!

14 The Lord says, “I will rescue those who love me.
    I will protect those who trust in my name.
15 When they call on me, I will answer;
    I will be with them in trouble.
    I will rescue and honor them.
16 I will reward them with a long life
    and give them my salvation.”

—Psalm 91:9-16, NLT

Overwhelmed yet Protected

For God has not given us a spirit of fearfulness,
but one of power, love, and sound judgment.
—1 Timothy 1:7

I didn’t realize until yesterday that almost two months have passed since I last posted here. Where has the time gone? Well, here is my update.

On the heels of some difficult health struggles last winter, I found out that my cataracts were finally at the point that I needed to have the dreaded surgery. I have known for probably 7 years that I have developed cataracts, but that they were slow-growing. So I never really gave it much thought … until last year when I started noticing how much more difficult it was to see most things from a distance, including the blurry faces on TV. I was also having trouble reading even my large print Bible, which made me thankful for my tablet because I could reset the size of the font.

I don’t know how other people react to cataract surgery but I was extremely unhappy and scared. I’ve worn eyeglasses since I was 11 or 12 years old and never considered contacts because I hate to have anyone, even me, messing around with my eyes. So the thought of having to undergo surgery on my eyes made me freak out. Last December when my ophthalmologist told me it was time for cataract surgery, I immediately burst into tears. I’m sure my doctor has seen this kind of reaction from many of his patients, so he just listened, nodded, and gave me time to compose myself before I left.

As I prayed about it that night, 1 Timothy 1:7 jumped into my mind: “For God has not given us a spirit of fearfulness, but one of power, love, and sound judgment.” That made me ask myself: if I am a child of God, why am I so fearful of this surgery? I decided to start praying right then for God’s spirit of power over my fear:

“Heavenly Father, You know how fearful and anxious I am about the cataract surgery. I ask You to fill me instead with Your power, strength, and peace about it, such that I can look forward to it with joy and great anticipation, knowing that I will be able to see so much better afterward. And I thank You right now for what I know You will do in my life through this situation to bring glory to Your Name.”

I didn’t only ask God to get me through the surgery and recovery. I also asked Him to change my extreme fear to joyful anticipation and I thanked Him ahead of time for what I knew He would do for and in me through this situation. I have trusted Him through many tense situations in my life and He has never let me down. Therefore, I also trusted Him implicitly this time, no matter what happened.

I prayed in this manner for several weeks, when one day I suddenly realized that I was no longer afraid of the upcoming surgery. That’s when I started smiling while I was praying, because I knew the Lord had already so magnificently answered my prayers!

The surgery itself did not take longer than about 15 minutes. It took longer for prep and recovery room time than it did for the actual surgery. I was given an anesthetic to sedate me but not put me completely to sleep, but I don’t remember drifting off to sleep or waking up again, or anything about the surgeries. One minute I was still talking to the anesthesiologist; the next I was sitting up in a wheelchair next to Rick, talking to the nurse who was handing me a cup of water. In all, Rick and I were away from home only about 4 hours.

My eyes are healing very well and I am so excited to be able to clearly see things at a distance. I am using and will continue to need reading glasses, but I am thrilled with how bright and true colors look now. However, the way my body feels is another story. My dear friend and fellow writer, Pat Knight, also had cataract surgery at almost the same time that I did. Since we email each other so often, we knew that we would both be needing cataract surgery this year, but we never discussed the dates. We couldn’t believe it when our surgery dates almost coincided. We both think this was God’s way of allowing us to encourage each other while recovering from the surgeries.

Pat told me recently that one word she would use to describe the surgeries and recovery weeks is overwhelmed. One of the definitions of overwhelm at Dictionary.com describes it as: to load, heap, treat, or address with an overpowering excessive amount of anything. Exactly!

The longer I live with Fibromyalgia (FMS) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), the more my body is badly affected by such things. I have been overwhelmed with constant body pain, plus I also had an awful GI (Gastrointestinal) reaction to one of the necessary eye drops. The surgery for each eye consisted of these appointments:

  • Pre-op
  • Surgery
  • 1-day post-op
  • 1-week post-op
  • 4-week post-op

Five (5) appointments for each eye! For someone who does not go out very often, and then usually only when necessary, all of these appointments have taken their toll. On top of that, I had to discontinue the medication I was taking for my migraines because of the nasty side effects, so my 24/7 migraines are back.

All in all, my entire body continues to feel like it was assaulted. Talk about overwhelming!

But… in the brokenness there is another, better kind of being overwhelmed: the good news that God magnificently answers prayer! Since He longs for us to trust Him rather than have a spirit of fear, He turned my anxiety and fright about this surgery into excitement and anticipation. He lavished me with His grace as He walked closely with me before and through each surgery.

And He said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you,
for My strength is made perfect in weakness.”
Therefore most gladly I will rather boast in my infirmities,
that the power of Christ may rest upon me.
—2 Corinthians 12:9

It is fair to say that my heart and mind almost daily utter these words now: thank You, Lord Jesus, my All in All…


Beloved, it will be a few more weeks until I am ready to fully be back to work on my blog, but I may reblog some old posts as I am able to. Thank you for sticking with me during all of this. You are all too precious to me!