Billy Graham: The Mystery of the Incarnation

This article about Jesus’ humanity (What did He become? Flesh) is the last of three excellent articles about the incarnation of Jesus Christ from the December 2017 issue of Decision Magazine.

Billy Graham:
The Mystery of the Incarnation

By Billy Graham

When you read the record of the coming of Jesus into the world—born in a stable, born of a woman, reared in the woodshop of a poor Jewish carpenter—you could not grasp the truth that He was the God-man if the Scriptures didn’t reveal it.

This great mystery of the incarnation is the crux and the core of the Christian message. It is the mystery over which the rationalists stumble, by which the humanists are offended, and by which the world is bewildered.

The natural mind is not equipped to grasp this truth that transcends human wisdom. Paul—after reasoning with the Greeks, who majored in knowledge, and with the Romans, who majored in justice—said, “Without controversy great is the mystery of godliness: God was manifested in the flesh, justified in the Spirit, seen by angels, preached among the Gentiles, believed on in the world, received up in glory” (1 Timothy 3:16).

I would like you to consider with me three facts regarding the incarnation.

First, the incarnation is a Scriptural fact. 

The recurring theme of the Bible is the incarnation of Jesus Christ. The prophets wrote of it, the psalmists sang of it, the apostles rejoiced and built their hopes on it and the epistles are filled with it. Christ’s coming in the flesh—His invading the world, His identifying Himself with sinful men and women—is the most significant fact of history. All of humanity’s puny acts, accomplishments and attainments pale into nothingness when compared to it.

Read the rest here.

‘What’s in it for Me?’: A Christmas Message

This article about Jesus’ activity (He became flesh and dwelt among us) is the second of three excellent articles about the incarnation of Jesus Christ from the December 2017 issue of Decision Magazine.

‘What’s in it for Me?’:
A Christmas Message

By R.T. Kendall

Our generation is often referred to as the “me generation.” A question many people ask is, “What’s in it for me?” This kind of thinking is one of the end results of existential philosophy that offers no hope but only despair. This line has crept into many universities, theological seminaries and churches all over the world. Much of theology today is anthropology—meaning it is mostly man-centered. The question, “What’s in it for God?” does not seem to cross people’s minds.

But that is the question I would put to you as we enter the Christmas season. So, what’s in it for God? The answer is, what’s in it for Him is what’s in it for you. The reason for Christmas is about God: His Son, His love, His plan and His purpose, and ultimately His glory.

Jesus Was Sent

A key word that makes this clear is sent. It comes largely from the Gospel of John. God sent Jesus from Heaven to earth. “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. … The Word became flesh” (John 1:1, 14). The Word became flesh because Jesus was sent by the Father. The term sent and its derivatives are found almost 60 times in the Gospel of John. Jesus came to earth because of the Father’s purpose. Jesus did not come to do His own will but the will of Him who “sent” Him (John 6:38). The Son can do “nothing of Himself” but only what He sees the Father doing (John 5:19). He said, “My food is to do the will of Him who sent me, and to finish His work” (John 4:34). In other words, it was a God-centered mission.

Read the rest here.

The Incarnation: Word Became Flesh

This article about Jesus Christ’s identity (John calls Him “the Word”)  is the first of three excellent articles about the incarnation of Jesus from the December 2017 issue of Decision Magazine.

The Incarnation: Word Became Flesh

By Skip Heitzig

“And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory,
glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth.”

—John 1:14, ESV

The statement in John 1:14 that “The Word became flesh and dwelt among us” is really the Christmas story pressed into a nutshell. This is the Main Event—Jesus, the eternal Word, became a human being and lived among us in obedience to the Father’s eternal, redemptive plan.

We as Christians know this. We tell this to our children every year. But we need to remember that it’s still a profound mystery—and one worth diving into. As Paul wrote in 1 Timothy 3:16, “Without question, this is the great mystery of our faith: Christ was revealed in a human body” (NLT). Let’s crack open that mystery a bit and look at three things revealed in John 1:14: Jesus’ identity, activity and humanity.

First is Jesus’ identity: John here calls Him “the Word.” That’s a rather impersonal way to describe somebody, isn’t it? So why did John do it? Where did the term the Word come from, and why is it important?

Read the rest here.