Job’s Trials

Job’s Trials

by Joni Eareckson Tada

“Then the Lord said to Satan,
‘Have you considered my servant Job?'”
–Job 1:8

The Bible infers that God always eventually gets His way. But what does that say about Him? God’s favorite planet has experienced a lot of evil over the years. Why hasn’t He stopped it or, at least curbed it? If God’s the boss, is Satan His employee? Let’s look at Job.

Job had it all — money, land, status, family. One day in God’s throne room, Satan broached his disgust over Job’s pious reputation. “The man loves you because you bribe him,” the devil argued. “But stretch out your hand and strike everything he has, and he will surely curse you to your face.” God answered, “Job is yours, only don’t lay a finger on his person.” The words were scarcely out of God’s mouth when lightning killed Job’s sheep and shepherds, a Chaldean raiding party plundered the cattle and herdsmen, then a mighty wind collapsed a roof on Job’s children. So we ask, who caused Job’s trials?

At the most basic level, natural forces did — desert winds blew and lightning struck. On the same level, evil people caused Job’s trials — greedy men killed and plundered. On another level, Satan caused Job’s problems — he leaves God’s presence, we scarcely blink, and carnage is everywhere; Satan engineered it all: the fire, the wind, and the sword. But on the deepest level, nothing happened that God did not decree. God permitted what He hated, to accomplish something He loved: the worship of a wiser Job.

Satan’s motive was to wreck Job’s life and mock God. God’s reaction to the devil was merely to lengthen his leash. God’s decree made room for evil to occur, but God didn’t do it. He simply exploited the deliberate evil of wicked people, as well as the impersonal evil of some bad storms without forcing anyone’s hands. How does God pull it off? Welcome to the world of finite human beings trying to comprehend an infinite God!

Almighty God, how unsearchable are Your judgments and Your ways past finding out! I simply praise You that Your decrees are perfect.

www.joniandfriends.org


Copyright © 2006. Pearls of Great Price by Joni Eareckson Tada. Published in print by Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

God’s Final Verdict and Vindication of Job

I receive Moody Bible Institute’s “Today in the Word” daily devotional booklets every month. This month’s booklet was titled “Job: Faith, Humility, and Worship.” Although I’ve studied the Book of Job several times, this devotional study has been by far the best. Please visit Today in the Word to subscribe to the email version of their daily devotionals, or to the booklet version which is delivered by snail mail.

God’s Final Verdict and Vindication of Job

Read Job 42:7–9

You have not spoken the truth about me, as my servant Job has.
Job 42:8

Christian musician and author Michael Card wrote a series of songs entitled the “Job Suite.” In one song, Job laments, “These friends of mine are no comfort to me / So deafly they listen, so blindly they see / Their words and their doctrine, they all sound so true / The problem is, Lord, they’re all wrong about You!” 

In today’s verses, God emphatically agreed with Job. Two verses in a row, He said to the friends, “You have not spoken the truth about me, as my servant Job has” (vv. 7–8). Job had believed God would vindicate him, and He did! God as Judge rendered His verdict, finding in favor of Job, who was indeed innocent, and against the three friends. They had behaved so badly, in fact, that they were required to offer substantial sacrifices publicly confessing the sinfulness of their speeches. In addition, in a perfect example of poetic justice, their former target Job offered intercessory prayer for them in order to obtain God’s forgiveness. 

Though Job and his foolish friends were unaware of the behind-the-scenes drama in the heavenly throne room, God’s verdict also sealed the case against Satan. Job had passed Satan’s test, as God knew he would. He had held onto faith in God, despite personal suffering and the stripping away of his secondary blessings. By contrast, the upside-down theology of the friends valued God’s blessings above God Himself. They were thus guilty of Satan’s accusation (1:9–11); ironically, given their claims to speak for God, they had often represented Satan’s perspective during the debate. 

Job had spoken rightly about God. The Lord is no clockwork mechanism of retributive justice, as envisioned by the friends. He is personally involved, He cares about us, and His plans reflect these truths despite our failure to understand. Even for the friends—who by their own rules deserved punishment—God made a way for them to be reconciled to Himself.

Apply the Word

Listening to Michael Card’s “Job Suite” would be an excellent way to review and meditate on the book of Job and our month’s study. This 10-minute biblically focused composition was originally on his album The Way of Wisdom, which itself was the second in a trilogy of albums about the Old Testament. It has since also appeared on another album, An Invitation to Awe.


Beloved, this is one of the songs on Michael Card’s “Job Suite” album mentioned above, a video (with lyrics). It is definitely worth the 10 minutes to watch and listen.

 

 

BlogSL2-smallest