Power Tool

Power Tool

By Pat Knight

If you were asked to identify the most precious, on-going blessings in your life, would prayer be the preeminent item on your list? Prayer is a spiritual gift that underpins all others. The ability to communicate with the Creator of the entire universe is an unprecedented privilege.

When Jesus lived on earth, people swarmed around Him constantly to listen to His astonishing messages and to observe miracles. To relax and refresh, Jesus spent time conversing with His heavenly Father. “Very early in the morning, while it was still dark, Jesus got up, left the house and went off to a solitary place, where he prayed” (Mark 1:35). If Jesus required the renewal and serenity inherent in prayer, how much more we need a sovereign boost of energy. Jesus teaches us the mental and physical benefits of relaxing as we seek the peace our Lord offers.

Conversation requires talking and listening. Such is the posture of prayer. Listening is an active art. To listen well, we must concentrate to eliminate distractions. “When you pray, go into your room, close the door and pray to the Father, who is in heaven. And, there your Father who sees what is done in secret will reward you” (Matthew 6:6, 18). The emphasis is talking to God in private.

I am going into my closet to talk with you, God. Quite possibly that closet may be only as far as behind my eyelids, while scrubbing in the shower, or when driving distances alone in the vehicle. God is pleased when we choose a quiet, undisturbed place where we give Him our undivided attention. He desires to fellowship with us, to accept our praise and adoration, and to hear our needs and concerns. No matter is too small or too large to present to our Lord.

The Greek word for a closet probably indicates the storeroom, for it was the only room in ancient houses that had a door that could be closed, providing privacy. We are instructed to pray as Jesus did. Seek a quiet area where interruptions do not compromise our effort. Distractions easily dissuade us from focusing on God alone. Our human minds easily wander and soon we lose sight of our intent. Satan loves to confuse our prayer efforts; to minimize our devotion and worship of our Lord, the supreme listener.

Though audible, public prayer is appropriate, Jesus mainly instructed His disciples in silent, secret prayer, a one-on-one private conversation between only God and the Christian. In our technological world, there is precious little individual privacy still existing. But, our Lord always keeps our confidence. We can share with Him details of our lives, including emotions we would never dream of divulging to another human.

Beyond secrecy and silence, Jesus commands steadfastness. He requires loyalty, dependability, and unswerving devotion.

Prayer is a power tool entrusted to believers for the benefit of all.

Let us be responsible with the tools with which Jesus equips us, to boldly request God’s miraculous interventions. God “is able to do exceeding abundantly beyond all that we ask or think, according to the power that works within us” (Ephesians 3:20, KJV). The most fantastic scenario our minds are able to contrive cannot equate to the splendiferous answers our Lord provides. Recall the marvelous answers He has furnished in the past and trust Him for the magnificent provisions He will provide to sustain you in the future.

Though God encourages us to request needs for ourselves and others, He is not a magician who jumps to do our bidding, giving us everything we want from a shopping list we present to Him. God’s priority is first of all a close relationship with Him predicated on the forgiveness of sins provided by His Son on the cross of Calvary. Prior to Christ’s sacrifice there was a wide chasm, an impasse between the Creator and the creature. When Jesus atoned for our sins, lavishing us with His redeeming grace, the abyss was closed forever, permitting communication with God the Father and God the Son.

At its most basic form, prayer is talking with God. We often complicate God’s commands with self-made rules when our heavenly Father wants us to follow the guideline established by Jesus. “Let us approach the throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in time of need” (Hebrews 4:16). Although we are encouraged to pray with boldness and confidence, we are to extend reverence and awe when speaking to God.

Our Lord already knows the thoughts of our minds, but He desires that we personally express them to Him. “For your Father knows what you need before you ask him (Matthew 6:8b). Intercessory prayer is our privilege of presenting the needs of others to Jesus. We are commanded to “Carry each other’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ” (Galatians 6:2). The willingness to help others with a selfless attitude is the hallmark of a Christian.

Christ is the conduit through whom our intercessions are made known to the Father. Prayer was conceived by God, made acceptable by the sacrifice of the pure Son of God, and is expressed for us by the Holy Spirit. All three personalities of the Deity participate in the important mechanism of prayer. The Holy Spirit teaches us God’s Word; the Son of God opens the pathway to prayer; God accepts our prayers in Christ’s behalf.

Prayer is a privilege; prayer is powerful; prayer is a problem-solver. The results of prayer are phenomenal! We converse with God in prayer and He speaks to us through His Word.

In the deepest of our being where our thoughts emerge, be open and frank, expressing doubts and worries. Dare to share dreams and aspirations. If our respectful minds form the words, then those thoughts are acceptable to God. It has been said that prayer is more an attitude of life than an action of the lips. Prayer is a healthy habit to develop. Soon, habits repeated transform to an integral part of one’s life.

We are commanded to “Pray without ceasing” (1 Thessalonians 5:17). With the power tool of prayer in hand and praise in our hearts, let us prioritize walking the pathways of continual prayer. We will then be the beneficiaries of one of the most precious interactive gifts available anywhere on earth!

Faithful is He who calls you

During my recent blog break, I spent a lot of time in the Word and in prayer. I started this blog in 2011 and the Lord has enabled me to continue, with similar breaks along the way. I have tried and discarded different blogging schedules, finally settling on my current twice-weekly one because it works best for me.

I’ve written before about the various health issues I live with, which often take over my life. 2019 started with 24/7 migraines which were amazingly worse than I could remember. A friend told us about a chiropractic method we had never heard of before, a more holistic approach to treating pain through specific spinal adjustments which are more gentle than the traditional adjustments I have tried in the past.

I’ve been into this now for almost three months and am extremely happy with the results. I still have migraines with fluctuating barometric pressure, but these migraines are ocular in nature rather than extremely painful. Now the only way I can tell I’m having a migraine is that my vision gets a little blurry and I have some nausea. I am also experiencing benefits in how my body processes/perceives daily pain by learning new breathing techniques and other gentle exercises to keep my body in better alignment.

So that’s my current health state, which I am constantly praising our Lord for as a huge answer to prayer! I am still going to keep my twice-weekly blogging schedule though because I am sure that the more my health issues get resolved, the more I will be able to do here at home. I am also looking forward to being able to do some traveling again, including going riding more often with Rick just for the sheer joy of it.

While thinking about my most recent blog break, it reminded me of a year-long hiatus from writing that I took about 15 years ago. I had no idea how that year would involve a huge amount of trust in Jesus, and in the process, He taught me much about how faithful and trustworthy He is. Here’s my story about that time.

Faithful is He who calls you
and He also will bring it to pass.
—1 Thessalonians 5:24

I’ve written many times about leaning on the Lord with faith and trust. Today I’d like to focus on how faith plays such a huge part in trusting and believing in the Lord’s timing.

By the way, “faith” (a noun) and “believe” (a verb) are both translated from the same Greek word. If you claim to have faith in God, then believing in Him is to put that faith into action. In other words, our faith leads to believing that what God says is true and more important than what we see or feel with our frail and easily persuaded human minds. God worked in my heart in a mighty way to show me how a believing faith can help me through everything in my life.

I don’t know about you but just when I feel comfortable with the way my life is going, that’s when I know God will start to shake things up a bit. I like to say He is moving me from one comfort zone to the next.

One of the examples of this in my life happened about 15 years ago. After several years of writing, my well of imagination seemed to have run dry. I had unexpectedly lost my desire to write.

Those who know me best suggested that I was probably experiencing writer’s block, but I learned that God simply had other plans for me. In the midst of my quiet times with Him, I felt Him telling me to stop everything writing-related for a time and focus on Him as I rested my exhausted body and mind.

As difficult as it was to understand this, I knew God was asking me to put into action what I believe to be true:

God is more than worthy of my faith and trust.

My writing hiatus came to an abrupt end about a year later when a writing assignment dropped into my inbox that I knew had to be from the Lord. I had sent my resume to a publisher the previous year and then forgotten about it. Now, this same publisher offered me an assignment that was tailor-made for my style of writing.

But there was a problem: not only was the deadline a mere three weeks away, but I needed to research and write while battling severe daily migraines.

The migraine issue was not a new thing, but I just cannot think clearly when in the midst of one of these nausea-creating, light- and sound-bothering, hair-hurting migraines hits me. And it was happening on a daily basis.

Nevertheless, I struggled through this assignment day after day, sometimes praying through my tears. And—day after day—God provided me with the ideas I needed plus the necessary strength to get this enormous amount of writing done in such a short period of time.

The finished book was a compilation of prayers written by several authors, including me. By the grace of God and by believing that He would faithfully help me complete this assignment on time, I met my deadline of composing 31 prayer devotionals.

You read that right: 31 devotionals in 3 weeks!

In great pain, I toiled through the writing of every single one of those devotionals but God was faithful in giving me the sufficient amount of strength I needed exactly when I needed it most. From time to time I’ve shared some of the devotionals here that I contributed to that book titled, Anytime Prayers for Everyday People, and I’ll continue that every so often.

Beloved, are you facing something in your life that seems too much for you to handle? Maybe—like I did—you think there is nothing you can contribute because of your circumstances or illness or limited energy.

If you take away anything from what I went through, it should be this:

When God wants us to do something for Him, He does not expect us to do it on our own. He just wants us to have faith and believe that He will walk with us through it.

Remember, He is the Great Enabler and will always grant us exactly the amount of strength and stamina we need to finish whatever He calls us to do!

Thankful for God’s Goodness

This is another of my devotionals published in an anthology titled Anytime Prayers for Everyday PeopleIt is included in the section titled Prayers of Praise and Thanksgiving.

When I want to thank God
for His goodness . . .

The LORD is good to all,
and His mercies are over all His works.

—Psalm145:9 NASB

I am still confident of this:
I will see the goodness of the LORD
In the land of the living.
—James 1:18 NLT 

How great is your goodness,
which you have stored up for those who fear you,
which you bestow in the sight of men
on those who take refuge in you.
—Psalm 31:19

In his goodness he chose to make us his own children by
giving us his true word. And we, out of all creation, became
his choice possession.
—Acts 10:43

. . . I will pray.

Loving Father,

I used to think of myself as a good person. I felt great about that, but now I know that the goodness in my soul is little more than a faint reflection of the goodness I see in You everyday. You are good in every way—without exception. I am good only as I keep my heart tuned in and submitted to You.

That’s easy to say, but not always so easy to do. I mean to be listening every minute, letting You oversee my motives, my actions, my words. But somehow the not-so-good part of me keeps getting through.

Lord, I know I’ll never be as good as You are—not in this life. But I know that You, Lord, can help me to be a much better person than I am right now. Work with me. Keep me on my toes. Let Your goodness flow through me to everyone I know.

You are so excellent, Lord. It’s an honor to be Your child, an honor to be able to learn from You and draw from Your utter perfection. Thank You, Lord, for Your goodness.

Amen.

The Lord’s goodness surrounds us at every moment.
I walk through it almost with difficulty,
as through thick grass and flowers.

—R. W. Barbour


[From Anytime Prayers for Everyday People. Copyright © 2006 Bordon-Winters LLC]

The God Without … A Thanksgiving Message

I have shared this message from Grace Thru Faith before, but it is so good that I decided to make it my annual Thanksgiving message. May you all enjoy a wonderful Thanksgiving Day!

The God Without …
A Thanksgiving Message

A Thanksgiving Message by Jack Kelley

Shout for joy to the LORD, all the earth. Worship the LORD with gladness; come before him with joyful songs. Know that the LORD is God. It is he who made us, and we are his; we are his people, the sheep of his pasture.

Enter his gates with thanksgiving and his courts with praise; give thanks to him and praise his name.   For the LORD is good and his love endures forever; his faithfulness continues through all generations. (Psalm 100)

Each year on the 4th Thursday of November we celebrate Thanksgiving Day in the US.  It’s a holiday begun by the early settlers to express their gratitude to God for a bountiful harvest, and it’s patterned after the Jewish Feast of Tabernacles.

After the harvest Israelites from all over the country would gather in Jerusalem for a week-long celebration. This was to commemorate the time God had spent with them in the wilderness and to give thanks for another good harvest. All year they saved up their tithes, the first-born of their flocks and herds, the first sheaves of grain, the first grapes, figs, olives and other fruit and vegetables and brought it all to Jerusalem in the fall where they cooked and ate everything in a national celebration of praise (Deut. 12:5-7).

After surviving a very difficult year in the new world, the Pilgrims of New England instituted a similar, though much smaller, thanksgiving feast, again with the intent of praising God.   This event finally became a national holiday in the US in 1863, but it took until 1941 to settle on the 4th Thursday of November as its official observance.

My parents made sure we never forgot that it was the Lord who provided for us and so Thanksgiving was a religious observance in our house. Prayers were offered and each family member gave thanks to the Lord for all the good things we had received.

Read the rest here.

Fisherman, Follow Me

Photo credit: freebibleimages.org

Fisherman, Follow Me

By Pat Knight

Peter’s extroverted personality may have been responsible for his leadership as spokesman for Jesus’ select group of twelve disciples. He was a flamboyant fellow whose brusqueness created trouble for himself and for his Master. Have you ever pondered the reason Christ recruited Peter as a disciple, when He fully recognized Peter’s propensity for aggression? Though impulsive and roughly hewn on the outside, Jesus looked into Peter’s heart to identify his potential for loyalty, submission, and reliability. Jesus knew Peter would develop into a powerhouse for the Kingdom of God in the future. But first, Jesus must sand the rough edges of Peter’s personal approach, teach him tenderness and tact, and impress upon His disciple the nature of his Master’s mission on earth.

Jesus’ disciples were a varied assortment of professions and personalities. None among them were important or accomplished. God chose ordinary men to perform extraordinary feats. The most unprepared were believers God could mold and make into a useable instrument for His glory. God peers into hearts, searching for a person’s capacity to serve, obey, and to conform to His will. God’s methods have not changed over the centuries. He converts His weak children to towers of strength to promote His important assignments, as the Spirit infuses us with power and direction.

A life-long fisherman by trade, Peter was self-assertive and independent, intrigued by the authority of the man who urged, “’Come, follow me, and I will send you out to fish for people’” (Matthew 4:19). Jesus issues the same command to all believers, encouraging us to depend on His leadership for every aspect of our lives. When questions or calamities arise, we need not scramble to find our own solutions; Jesus is our close companion, ready to answer and aid at a moment’s notice. In fact, our Savior already knows in advance what will occur in our future. Trusting His guidance and grace offers tranquility when we are surrounded by anxious moments, allowing Jesus to fight our battles and achieve the victory He promises. “Do not be afraid or discouraged … for the battle is not yours, but God’s. You will not have to fight this battle. Have faith in the Lord your God and you will be upheld” (2 Chronicles 20:15b; 17a; 20b).

Peter was impetuous. When he recognized Jesus walking on water, he requested his Master summons him to walk toward Him in the middle of the lake. Peter successfully took several steps on water—until the gusting wind distracted him. Doubt overwhelmed his faith and he began to sink. “Immediately Jesus reached out his hand and caught him. “‘You of little faith,’ Jesus said, ‘why did you doubt?’” (Matthew 14:31).It took courage for Peter to leave the safety of the disciple’s boat, depending solely on Jesus to enable him to step onto the surface of the water. Whenever believers divert their focus from Jesus in the midst of a storm, our present fear claims more prominence than our trust in Jesus. Like Peter, we lose faith and begin to sink from the Master’s presence. The tangible difference between fear and faith is Jesus!

The Messiah began preparing His disciples by teaching them about His future suffering and death. “Peter took him {Jesus} aside and began to rebuke him. ‘Never, my Lord!’ he said, ‘This shall never happen to you!’ Jesus turned and said to Peter, ‘Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; you do not have in mind the concerns of God, but merely human concerns’” (Matthew 16:22-23). Peter was struggling with unbelief, exposing his own impulsive methods. When Jesus compared Peter’s actions to Satan, his arrogant behavior exposed an adversary or an accuser.

In the garden the night Jesus was arrested, Peter’s combative nature was revealed when he instinctively whacked off the high priest servant’s ear with a sword. “Jesus commanded Peter, ‘Put your sword away!’” (John 18:11). Did Peter still believe that Jesus’ purpose on earth was to condemn and destroy? Jesus touched the servant’s ear, healing him instantly. When would Peter learn to trust the saving grace and mercy of the Son of God?

Photo credit: freebibleimages.org

At the Passover feast, Jesus predicted Simon Peter would disown Him three times before the rooster crowed. A few hours later, still vacillating between fear and courage, Peter took his focus off Jesus until the last rooster crowed, the moment when the servant and the Master’s eyes met. “The Lord turned and looked straight at Peter. Then Peter remembered the word the Lord had spoken to him. And he went outside and wept” (Luke 22:61-62). How would Peter compensate for such personal failure? By running to the garden, the first of the disciples to meet his risen Savior. Later, Peter was the only apostle to be spiritually reinstated by his Lord (John 21:15-19).

Like the audacious disciple, we may be unaware of our own spiritual deficiencies. Following Jesus from afar as Peter did the night of his betrayal, is a dangerous posture for any of us to assume. When believers learn to trust Jesus wholeheartedly, there emerges a vivacious, vital person whose sole purpose is to concentrate on the Savior. Let us readily admit, as the Israelites did long ago:

“‘We do not know what to do, but our eyes are upon you’” (2 Chronicles 20:12), a prayer that God the Father honored.

Simon Peter is a vivid example of the transforming power of the Holy Spirit. Peter was the emboldened orator on Pentecost Sunday, where 3,000 people were converted to Christianity. He had evolved from headstrong to humble; from arrogant to obedient; from timid to fearless. Simon Peter’s spiritual metamorphosis was evidenced as the first disciple to confess to Jesus, ”’You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God’” (Matthew 16:16). Inspired by the Holy Spirit, the uneducated disciple authored two New Testament epistles bearing his name. He became a pillar of the emerging church and the first apostle to preach the Gospel to the Gentiles. A self-sufficient heart was rehabilitated into a dependent servant fashioned for heaven’s work!

We are confident that each life responds to miraculous spiritual reform. The most bombastic attitude can be tempered and used for God’s glory. Our Lord chooses ordinary believers for colossal assignments, strengthening and empowering them with Jesus’ attributes. God modified Peter’s rebellious characteristics, substituting qualities and sensitivities previously undeveloped in the disciple. All believers are blessed with capabilities that blossom under sovereign tutelage. Jesus is the compassionate Son of God, willing to invest his own perfect life for the purpose of redeeming and reconstructing each of ours.

“See what great love the Father has lavished on us,
that we should be called children of God! And that is what we are!”
(I John 3:1).

For Now We Rejoice in Part

Sharing today from Desiring God.

For Now We Rejoice in Part

By Scott Swain

God has promised his people supreme, unending, unshakeable happiness. Contrary to the claims of popular prosperity preachers, however, the supreme happiness God promises his people will not be realized in this life. Ours is a life characterized by sorrow in many ways. For now, we rejoice only in part.

There are two reasons for this. First, though the Father’s will to make us happy does not change, and though the Son’s work of securing our happiness is complete, the Spirit’s work of showing and bestowing happiness to us and upon us has only begun. By God’s triune mercy, we have been reconciled to the order of beatitude, what Augustine calls “the perfectly ordered and harmonious enjoyment of God, and of one another in God.”1 However, as Augustine goes on to tell us, ours is a happiness “we enjoy now with God by faith, and shall hereafter enjoy eternally with him by sight.”2

Second, having been reconciled to God’s order of beatitude, we have been brought into a state of conflict with the order of sin and misery, which wars against the happy God and the people who find their happiness in him. As William Perkins observes, “True happiness with God is ever joined, yea covered many times, with the cross in this world.”3 Our happiness has not yet fully arrived. Our happiness is not yet without opposition. For these two reasons, “sorrowful, yet always rejoicing” (2 Corinthians 6:10) characterizes the happiness of the people whose God is the Lord as they make their pilgrimage to the happy land of the Trinity.4

Happy Now and Not Yet

In his Sermon on the Mount, our Lord Jesus Christ instructs pilgrims on the path to God’s eternal kingdom regarding the way of happiness.5 In contrast to “the error of all philosophers,” who locate happiness in “pleasure,” “wealth,” and “civil virtue,” God’s Wisdom incarnate sets out the “the nature and estate of true felicity.”6

Read the rest here.