Thought Patrol

Thought Patrol

 

When anyone hears the message about the kingdom
and does not understand it,
the evil one comes and snatches away
what was sown in his heart… 
Matthew 13:19

The devil can invade our mental privacy?! The very thought sends shivers. And it should. Satan tries to tap into our brains all the time. He’s a regular soul-hacker — like the techno-geeks on their computers at home, breaking security codes and logging onto sensitive government systems. Scripture calls him “the spirit who is now at work in those who are disobedient,” and today’s verse describes his access to the human soul.  

People joke about this and say, “The devil made me do it.” They laugh because they don’t think he exists. And if there is a devil, he’s their ex-spouse. Meanwhile their minds are as soaked with his suggestions as a pickle in vinegar. They don’t see him — he’s a spirit. They don’t hear him — he has tiptoed in sock-footed. If they do catch some small noise at their mind’s door, they assume it’s just opportunity knocking.  

But Christians know better; they understand the power of their invisible tempter. We are aware, as well as wary. The wonderful thing for the Christian is, 1 John 4:4-5 says, “…the one who is in you is greater than the one who is in the world.” His Spirit helps you stand guard over your mind with the power of God’s Word.  

Put a barbed wire fence around your thinking. Make your will “stand guard” over your mind with the ammunition of God’s Word. Learn to recognize the devil’s tactics so that you can shoot down every suggestion — every temptation — of the enemy today. And take courage knowing that if Satan can be stealthful for evil’s sake, God is much more at work for goodness’ sake.  

Spirit of Christ, please help me stand guard over my thoughts today. Help me to resist any suggestion from the devil that I offend You, hurt my brother, or tarnish my own testimony through sin or selfishness.


Taken from Pearls of Great Price. Copyright © 2006 by Joni Eareckson Tada. Published in Print by Zondervan, Grand Rapids. All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible: New International Version.

Attentive Listening

Attentive Listening

By Pat Knight

Mary of Bethany, a sibling of Martha and Lazarus, possessed enviable listening skills. When Jesus visited their home, she sat at His feet with her rapt attention hanging on each of her Master’s words. Mary unabashedly worshipped Jesus, captivated by her Friend to the exclusion of all others present.

 On the same occasion when Mary and Martha prepared a dinner for Jesus and His disciples, Martha demanded. “‘Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!’” (Luke 10:40). To Martha’s surprise, the Lord commended Mary’s actions, tenderly replying, “‘Martha, Martha, you are worried and upset about many things, but few things are needed—or indeed only one. Mary has shown what is better, and it will not be taken away from her’” (Luke 10:41-42).

Both Mary and Martha loved their Lord, but Martha allowed distractions to divide her devotion. No doubt she wanted a delicious, perfectly presented dinner for her guests, straight from Martha Stewart’s handbook. But, it was Mary who displayed compassion, kneeling before Jesus, intently absorbing every word, noticing each gesture, studying His facial expressions, and discerning silent or spoken aspects of His conversation. Mary listened audibly and visually.

On that evening of dinner fellowship six days prior to Christ’s crucifixion, Mary poured a pint of expensive perfume over Jesus’ feet in anticipation of His upcoming sacrifice. She didn’t ask her Lord’s permission; she intuitively knew that Jesus would approve of her gracious act. Surrounded by men, Mary wasn’t intimidated. Loosening her long hair to wipe Jesus’ feet of excess oil displayed Mary’s humility; a respectable woman didn’t unbind her hair in public. Her submissive spirit was apparent; caring for feet was servant’s work. Mary’s actions spoke volumes. By anointing Jesus’ feet, she demonstrated that she understood Jesus’ teaching about His future death and burial far better than His disciples did.

Listening is an active art. It takes commitment to heed God’s words. To hear well, we must concentrate fully, not permitting distractions to eclipse our attention. Adequate listening skills allow us to know the will of our heavenly Father for our individual lives. We hear God speak to us through His Word as He communicates His love, commands, and our relationship to Him and to others.

God has surely listened and has heard my prayer.
Praise be to God, who has not rejected my prayer or withheld his love from me.
—Psalm 66:19-20

Prayer time without listening is simply a one-sided conversation, a monologue rather than a dialogue. “Love the Lord your God, listen to his voice, and hold fast to him. For the Lord is your life” (Deuteronomy 30:20). Prayer and praise, listening and love, complement one another as we interact with Jesus Christ in a personal relationship.

God no longer speaks audibly or in dreams to believers as was His custom in times past. Now the Holy Spirit interprets God’s messages and illuminates God’s written Word, making His personal guidance and wisdom available to us.

While Jesus was teaching in the temple courts, the large crowd was listening to him with delight” (Mark 12:35a; 37b). When was the last time you listened to your Lord during prayer, from His Word, or while reading Christian literature, reacting with extreme satisfaction and great pleasure, the kind of attention Almighty God deserves?

Let us not miss the sovereign plans about which God desires to advise us through His Spirit. Live in anticipation of His words, confident that our two-way communication is functioning to full capacity. More than any other discernable sound in our world, yearn to recognize God’s soothing words. He provides power to persist toward the ultimate goal of spiritual victory as we listen, follow, and trust Him explicitly.

A father used a game of ball toss as an object lesson to instruct his son regarding a well-balanced conversation. For a while the two threw the ball back and forth, settling into a predictable rate. Then, the father dropped the ball and refused to continue the volley. When the bewildered son asked his parent to explain his behavior, his father compared his actions to those of an unbalanced verbal discussion: just as dropping or hogging the ball disrupts a game, such is the way with conversation involving an unequal exchange of listening and speaking. Concentration is required to keep the ball in motion just as shared dialogue keeps conversation moving. Prayer, like a game of ball, is participatory activity. The alternative is talking to oneself, and we all know how non-stimulating that can be!

Our Lord is never too busy, distracted, or preoccupied to harken to the emotions attached to each word. God listens with love. Though He is aware of the intent of our hearts before we speak, God is pleased to hear from us. “‘Before they call, I will answer; while they are still speaking, I will hear’” (Isaiah 65:24).

If we maintain candid, vivacious communication with God, as Mary of Bethany demonstrated, our listening skills will soon produce pleasing acts of worship to Him and service to others. Jesus promised, “‘You are my friends if you do what I command’” (John 15:14). What a privilege, to claim the sovereign Savior as a personal friend, who listens to us and expects attentiveness to His voice. Could there be anything more satisfying?

Before you pray, ask the Holy Spirit to clear your mind of entangled thoughts and distractions, to focus entirely upon the glory of God. Then your heart will be receptive to His guidance. In the quietness of your prayer time, ask God to reveal Himself. He will gladly open your mind and heart to reveal paths to follow Him. “Listen to my instructions and be wise; do not disregard it. Blessed are those who listen to me” (Proverbs 8:33-34a).

Learn to be attentive to your Savior with the bold singlemindedness Mary exhibited. Incredible interactions occur at the feet of Jesus as we submit, weep, confess, and listen for our Master’s divine words designed solely for our needs.

What Is It Like To Enjoy God?

Sharing today from Desiring God.

What Is It Like To Enjoy God?

By John Piper

The enjoyment of God is the enjoyment of a Person — not just the enjoyment of a thing, or an idea, or a pattern of actions, or a mysterious force. The ultimate joy of God’s creatures is joy in a Person — joy in God.

This is exactly why Jesus died. The apostle Peter says, “Christ suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God” (1 Peter 3:18). To God. The Person. What makes eternal life desirable is not just that it lasts forever, but that it is knowing and enjoying an infinitely satisfying Person. And he is also a Person who, in his human nature, died so that he could be known and enjoyed.

Enjoy the Person

But how do we come to know the Person? We come to know him by his actions, his ideas revealed in his word — things that he has made as pointers and foretastes of himself.

“In this the love of God was made manifest among us, that God sent his only Son into the world, so that we might live through him” (1 John 4:9). We know the love of the Person by the action of the Person. We know the power of the Person by the action of his creation of the universe (Romans 1:18–20). We know the wisdom of the Person by his purposeful providence in history (Romans 11:33–36). We know the justice and righteousness of the Person by the punishment of sin in the death of Jesus (Romans 3:24–26). We know the faithfulness of the Person by the keeping of his promises (2 Corinthians 1:20). We know the compassion and patience of the Person because we know Jesus Christ who said, “Whoever has seen me has seen the Father” (John 14:9).

So as you meditate on the perfect work of your God, let Scripture compel you to enjoy the Person:

  • Rejoice in the Lord always. (Philippians 4:4)
  • Delight yourself in the Lord. (Psalm 37:4)
  • Be glad in the Lord. (Psalm 32:11)
  • In your presence there is fullness of joy. (Psalm 16:11)
  • The Lord is my chosen portion and my cup. (Psalm 16:5)
  • As a deer pants for flowing streams, so pants my soul for you, O God. My soul thirsts for God, for the living God. (Psalm 42:1–2)
  • I stretch out my hands to you; my soul thirsts for you like a parched land. (Psalm 143:6)
  • We rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received reconciliation (Romans 5:11).

Enjoy His Gifts

And the same is true with things and human experiences. God gives them to us to reveal more of his character, essence, and unsurpassed worth.

Read the rest here.

#Trust in the Lord … Always {Reblog}

Trust in the Lord with all your heart
and do not lean on your own understanding;
in all your ways acknowledge Him,
and He will make your paths straight.
—Proverbs 3:5-6

Over the years, the Lord has given me several life verses. This Proverbs passage was the first one and is probably dearest to my heart because it was one of the reasons Rick and I started talking online. He and I both cited this passage in our profiles because we both love this verse. And here we are, over 18 years 20 years later, still relying on the verse that brought us together!

Underneath the Everlasting Arms

Underneath the Everlasting Arms

The eternal God is your refuge,
and underneath are the everlasting arms.
—Deuteronomy 3:27

What is your trust level with God? Do you just give lip service to the word “trust” or do you really mean it when you say you trust Him?

Here in the southwest, the summers always bring a danger of wildfires. I can choose to live in fear that the next fire will be close to where I live or I can trust that if that happens, God will take care of me and my family.

Some people have a real fear of flying and avoid it at all costs. I knew a woman who refused to fly anywhere—until her grandchildren moved over 3,000 miles away. She realized then that she had to put her fears aside and trust God to keep her safe on the flights there and back. After her vacation was over, she said that she still did not like to fly, but at least she finally gave it a try and said she would do it again for the chance to see her precious grandchildren.

As we experienced all over this country last year in unimaginably big ways, people faced various weather calamities: fires, blizzards, hurricanes, tornadoes, blinding rain and thunderstorms, flooding, or dense fog. There is no perfect place to live here on earth. No matter where we live, we are faced with a nasty weather situation sometime during the year. This is just a fact of life.

There is only one thing to do when faced with calamity or tragedy of any kind, and that is to rush to the everlasting arms of the only one who can grant us true refuge in the midst of any storm. I like to picture God holding His arms out to me when I need comforting, just as a father comforts his child. God is our ultimate Father, the one who shelters us next to Him, tucking us securely underneath His everlasting arms.

Perhaps if we keep in mind God’s protective presence in our lives, we’ll be more apt to stay close to His side and lean on Him always—not just when there is nowhere else to turn. Our only true refuge is God, the only one in whom we can put our complete trust.

Busy Bodies

Eph5-16--AMP

Busy Bodies

By Patricia Knight

To qualify that we live in a society comprised of busy people is an understatement of major proportions. Frantic to the point of distraction may be a more appropriate consequence of the activities that crowd our lives. We are proficient at multi-tasking. Dates on our calendars are filled months in advance. We are slaves of the ever-ticking clock, attuned to a shrieking alarm each morning. We are tethered to a cell phone and addicted to texting, both alerting us to instant updates of personal and newsworthy nature. 

Whether we tap our toes to the beat of music or an engineer calculates the exact orbit of a space rocket, we function in a time-space perimeter. Work weeks are identified by specific hours. The world is divided into established time zones; multiple time pieces line airport walls, identifying current hours for each country on an international scale. Clocks and calendars are integral components of our daily lives.

Do we feel the stranglehold of time commitments threatening our sanity like a speeding train out of control? We are finite beings; our time is limited, prompting us to use every hour to its full advantage. “Therefore be careful how you walk, not as unwise men, but as wise, making the most of your time” (Ephesians 5:16, NAS). We are instructed to walk paths of spiritual wisdom, looking toward Jesus, revealing the urgency of our time and the necessity of obediently serving God each day.

Have you ever wondered how God manages His time? He maintains the solar system, answers incessant prayers, solves myriad crises, assigns angels to divine message delivery, interacts with believers, fulfills prophesies, and restrains Satan, just a smattering of our Lord’s functions. God is bound to neither clock nor calendar, exclusively human devices.  “With the Lord a day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like a day” (2 Peter 3:8-9). God has an eternity behind Him and another in the future. Why should He hurry? Though our Lord could have created the world within seconds by merely issuing a decree, He purposely savored the experience, accomplishing miraculous handiwork each day for a week.

Our heavenly Father is patient with His children. He is delaying future prophesied events to provide the opportunity for everyone, everywhere, to come to know Jesus personally. God is long-suffering, tenderly waiting for all people to respond to His unconditional love, constantly involved in our lives, everywhere present simultaneously.

Do we envision our prayers stacked up in a heavenly e-mail file, waiting for God to read in chronological order? “Before a word is on my tongue you know it completely, O Lord. For you created my inmost being; you knit me together in my mother’s womb, your eyes saw my unformed body. All the days ordained for me were written in your book before one of them came to be” (Psalm 139: 4;13-16). Our Creator knew each of us before we were born, He formed each individual, watched over the development of each cell in utero, and is now intimately familiar with each life. God has full view into our hearts, aware of every thought and intent, knowledgeable of the words we will say before tongues utter them.

God is immortal and infinite. He existed in eternity past and He will live forevermore. There is no need for Him to count minutes or days. He alone created time and matter. Our heavenly Father designed, created, and now maintains the entire universe. He accomplishes everything with patient purpose. Our Lord is immutable, not subject to change. His character is inconsistent with errors, displaying only purity and holiness. We are commanded, “Be holy because I am holy” (1 Peter 1:15), set apart, separated from sin and impurity, and devoted to God.

Ps118-24--AMP

Since we aren’t going to change our time-oriented world, how can we attain a more God-like approach to daily life? This is the day the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it” (Psalm 118:24). We are commanded to “pray without ceasing” (Ephesians 6:18), “rejoice always” (Philippians 4:4), and to offer “thanksgiving in all circumstances” (1 Thessalonians 5:18), thereby adopting Jesus’ priorities.

God is our Protector. “He who watches over you will neither slumber nor sleep. The Lord will keep you from all harm—he will watch over your life; the Lord will watch over your coming and going both now and forevermore” (Psalm 121:3; 7-8). Our Lord is the unsleeping guardian of our souls, the One in whom we are commanded to confidently place our trust.

In our time-space framework, we confront limits. Because we are finite, we must be cognizant of clocks and calendars to responsibly manage our predetermined amount of time each day. Not one of us possesses the ability to be all things to all people at all times. Only God is described as omnipotent, all-powerful; omniscient, all-knowledgeable; omnipresent, responsive to everyone at one time. Our heavenly Father is infinite, with no limits to His presence or His person. He is timeless—eternal.

It is impossible for our mortal minds to grasp the idea of timelessness. Eternity is not an abstract term that describes a place somewhere out in the fuzzy hereafter. Eternal is a Person who was incarnated to live among us on earth. The Son of God taught us of His Father’s faithfulness and of His trustworthy promises. Jesus Christ is eternal; He has no end. As co-heirs with Christ, believers inherit the gift of eternal life that our Savior sacrificially earned for us on the cross of Calvary.

When Jesus appeared to His disciples after He arose from the dead, His resurrection body was not constrained by time or travel, unrestricted by walls or doors. He appeared and reappeared at will. When we live eternally with our Savior in heaven, the time-space limits we now experience will disappear; not a clock or a calendar will be needed. What a magnificent reward eternity will be for believers currently bound by finite obstacles.

King David wrote Psalm 31 during terrifying times when his enemies conspired against him using such overt, powerful intimidation tactics, David’s friends abandoned him. Even so, David admitted, “’I trust in you, O Lord,’ I say, ‘you are my God. My times are in your hands’” (Psalm 31: 14-15). Like David, do we desire to place our time and our lives in the Almighty’s capable hands, with unwavering trust against powerful enemies and unknown forces, relying implicitly on His faithfulness and power? Earthly time produces significant consequences when God’s characteristics permeate our lives. Readily accept the reputation as a busy body for Christ!